Wang Zheng-Ting (Sheng) and Adam Simmons (saxophone). Photo: Kevin Peterson.

Wu Xing (The Five Elements)—Adam Simmons’ Origami national tour 2019

Jazz virtuosos to tour nation with joyous, magical ‘auditory spectacle’
Adam Simmons and Origami join forces with Wang Zheng-Ting

One of Australia’s finest jazz/art music saxophonists, composers and band leaders Adam Simmons is launching his first national tour with his trio Origami, accompanied by world-renowned Sheng player Wang Zheng-Ting, through August—October this year.

Critics say Simmons is producing some of the most “breathtakingly beautiful” jazz in Australia or anywhere else. Electrifying both recorded and in concert, Origami’s music is quite unlike anything you’ve ever heard.

Hailed as one of Simmons’ strongest projects, the trio formed in 2010 and has wowed at festivals ever since. Origami’s sold-out concert at Stonnington Jazz Festival this year was described by Australian Book Review as “the standout performance” of the Festival.

Their album Wu Xing—The Five Elements was deservedly nominated for The Age Music Victoria Awards Best Jazz Album 2018, with its mesmerising exploration of the Wu Xing—the five elements  (wood, fire, earth, metal and water) that underpin Chinese philosophy, drawing parallels between music and nature.

The Wu Xing tour comes hot on the heels of Simmons’ critically-acclaimed five-part concert series and CD box set, The Usefulness of Art, which drew four-and-five-star reviews from The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, Arts Hub, and Australian Book Review.

The tour features longtime Simmons collaborator Wang Zheng-Ting on Sheng (Chinese mouth organ). Ting is a world-renowned musician, musical director, lecturer, author and ethnomusicologist whose “exceptional artistry” sees the Sheng “flutter and dance with the delicacy of butterfly wings, though it can also pulse with rhythmic vitality” (Sydney Morning Herald).

Simmons is known for stretching the boundaries of modern jazz composition and performance, and infusing a sense of wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. With Origami, his alto saxophone is perfectly complemented by virtuoso bandmate Howard Cairns’ gentle strength on double bass and Hugh Harvey’s exuberant drumming style.

The Wu Xing tour takes in major cities and regional centres including Sydney (Sound Lounge), Canberra (Drill Hall Gallery), Newcastle’s Grand Hotel, Melbourne (Jazzlab), Adelaide (Nexus Arts), Mildura, Geelong (Courthouse Theatre), and Hobart (MONA), with more dates being added.

The tour concludes with a celebratory concert at the Melbourne Recital Centre with the Australian-Chinese Music Ensemble, commemorating both the MRC’s 10th anniversary and the ACME’s 30th anniversary.

Workshops will also be available in a number of towns, offering a rare opportunity to learn from these masters (supported by Forestone Japan and The Music Place).

WU XING NATIONAL TOUR DATES

Sat Oct 5 Uniting Church Hall, Wangaratta, tickets

Thu Oct 10 Courthouse Youth Arts, Geelong, tickets

Sat Oct 12 Christ Church Longford, Tasmania 

Sun Oct 13 MONA, Berriedale, Tasmania, details

Media release written by Diana Wolfe and Gianna Huesch

Butoh—the dance world’s punk rock—
is here to disrupt your preconceptions of dance

Tickets are now on sale for the eagerly-awaited 2019 ButohOUT! Festival—Forbidden Laughter. Thanks to pioneering Japanese-Australian performance artists Yumi Umiumare and Takashi Takiguchi, Melburnians have the chance to experience this unique and captivating dance form. Incorporating elements of cabaret, Bouffon, burlesque and visual installations, Forbidden Laughter is created by Yumi Umiumare along with award-winning performer Maude Davey, and the unstoppable force of WEAVE Movement Theatre, devious duo Willow J Conway and Zya Kane, and the Butoh OUT! Ensemble.

About Butoh
Australia’s love for dance shows no sign of waning and we’ve demonstrated our eagerness to embrace genres from around the world. We lap up the televised dance shows, from Dancing With The Stars to So, You Think You Can Dance. And on any night of the week, we can head to a class and kick up our heels in the style of our choice, whether it’s rock-and-roll, Latin, Irish, tap, line dancing, clogging and more. So when you think of imported dance styles, Butoh probably won’t spring to mind… and yet this Japanese-born performance medium offers us the chance to immerse ourselves in a fascinating, hitherto unexplored dance form that’s as revolutionary and subversive to dance as punk rock was to popular music.
Butoh, the so-called Dance of Darkness, emerged out of post-WWII Japan as a rebellious and anti-establishment reaction to the country’s social turmoil. Butoh’s crude physical gestures and ‘natural’ movements rejected traditional Japanese aesthetics of refinement and understatement, and eschewed what creators Hijikata Tatsumi and Ohno Kazuo saw as the imitation of Western dance styles. Butoh dancers were commonly covered in white full body paint, near-naked with shaved heads, moving excruciatingly slowly with clawed hands and rolled-up eyes, silently screaming.
The first Butoh performance at a Japanese dance festival in 1959—which incorporated a live chicken—shocked audiences and not only saw Hijikata banned from the festival, but established him as a cultural iconoclast.

ButohOUT! 2019—Forbidden Laughter
Now in its third year, ButohOUT! challenges the perception of Butoh as dark and grotesque by combining the dancing with elements of cabaret, Bouffon, burlesque, physical theatre and visual installations. Celebrating the unique and powerful performance medium of Butoh, Forbidden Laughter invites audiences into surreal narratives through a bizarre and mysterious domesticated installation within the rustic industrial school of Abbotsford Convent.
Forbidden Laughter is created and conceived by leading Butoh artist Yumi Umiumare in collaboration with Takashi, along with award-winning performance artist, Maude Davey and the unstoppable force of WEAVE Movement Theatre, devious duo Willow J Conway and Zya Kane and the Butoh OUT! Ensemble. Strange and absurd stories are woven between worlds that are mythically sacred and divinely carnal; the sensibilities of the East and West collide in a contemporary setting designed by the internationally acclaimed Thai sculptor, Pimpisa Tinpalit.
The two-month Festival program includes four public workshops held in March and April, two weeks of performances from Thursday 2 May—Sunday 12 May, and discussion groups. Facilitated by professional award-winning performance and visual artists and theatre-makers, the workshops are designed to cater for all age groups and stages of accomplishment including absolute beginners through to dance professionals, making Butoh accessible and engaging for all. The performance season will involve workshop participants (including dancers from the renowned WEAVE Movement Theatre) as well as the workshop leaders.

Creative team: Artistic director Yumi Umiumare, Producer Takashi Takiguchi, Dramaturg Maude Davey, Visual artist Pimpisa Tinpalit. ButohOUT! is being held in partnership with Abbotsford Convent and is supported by the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria; Arts Access Victoria; and WEAVE Movement Theatre.

Media release written by Diana Wolfe and Gianna Huesch

“Not All Who Wonder Are Last”—Bowlines CD launch 2018

World-class Melbourne improv string trio BOWLINES releases second album

Three of Australia’s leading improvising bowed string players, Bowlines, will launch their new CD, Not All Who Wonder Are Last, on Sunday 7 October at Carlton Church of All Nations.

Not All Who Wonder Are Last is a wellspring of sparkling improvised instrumental music created by Australia’s leading klezmer violinist, Ernie Gruner, with virtuoso players Helen Mountfort (cello; Cosmo Cosmolino) and Hope Csutoros (violin, viola; The Stiletto Sisters, Circus Oz).
The recording captures the trio’s inspired interplay, their musical brilliance, and the love, trust and respect they bring to each other, their music, and the moment.
The CD is true to the trio’s collaborative and creative sensibilities in every way, with input from artists including storyteller Niki Na Meadhra. Niki’s choice of the title Not All Who Wonder Are Last is a beautiful word play on J R R Tolkien’s “Not all those who wander are lost” line from the poem “All that is gold does not glitter” (Lord of the Rings). It speaks to the notion that slowing down to wonder may be at first a delay, but ultimately it is an enhancement of pace, focus and direction in a creative journey.
Like watching a flock of birds circling at dusk, engaging in an unexpectedly enlivening conversation with a stranger at a party, or turning—on a whim—to saunter down an unfamiliar path, Not All Who Wonder Are Last evokes a sense of exploration, playful whimsy and the inherent value of taking time to wonder and ponder.
The launch concert will be a theatrical and musical extravaganza, featuring improvised music from Ernie, Hope and Helen, along with creative contributions from Adam Simmons (saxophone, flute, clarinet and words), Karen Berger (hang drum), and members of the Melbourne Playback Theatre Company as well as Travel Art Theatre Company.
Bowlines concerts are a breath-taking experience for audiences, inviting them to dive into a rich and intense new world of ephemeral music. The players’ melodies curve and weave, together and apart, creating harmonies that fill the space and reach into the heart. In the words of one audience member, “… it’s inspiring to be in the presence of the communion, the communication, the listening, the connection between the musicians and to receive the gift of their musical creation, happening in the moment”.
Their CD launch will offer Melbourne audiences a rare opportunity to hear these three world-class string musicians creating new music in the moment and inviting others to experience the magical and transformative power of collective improvisation.



ABOUT BOWLINES

Ernie Gruner formed the Bowlines trio in 2012 to create new improvised music by virtuoso bowed string players from eclectic backgrounds with a shared passion for improvising. The group’s music is inspired by The Necks (Australian experimental jazz trio), Coolangubra (atmospheric, genre-defying music), Kronos Quartet (celebrated contemporary US string quartet) and Born In A Taxi (improvisational theatre). Not All Who Wonder Are Last is Bowlines’ second CD (their debut was Circling Strangers).

MUSICIAN BIOS

Ernie Gruner (violin/viola, octave violin)
Ernie is widely recognised as Australia’s leading klezmer violinist and a significant contributor to the development of Australia’s world music scene (earning him a profile in Seth Jordan’s 2010 book World Music: Global Sounds in Australia).
Ernie has co-founded, performed, recorded with and guested in countless bands, theatre and cabaret groups, at countless major festivals and concert venues. He appeared twice on ABC TV’s musical quiz program, Spicks and Specks, and has more than 75 recording credits to his name.
His studies in New York, Kracow, Budapest and Montreal have helped him develop a technical brilliance that gives wings to his love of improvised music, resulting in inspired performances across multiple genres including klezmer, jazz, blues, Latin, art music, and folk (Middle Eastern, Balkan, Irish, Australian bush, gypsy), as well as in cabaret and theatre.
Renowned for his ambitious and ingenious musical collaborations, and as a much-loved fellow musician on the world music scene, he’s been a member of Dya Singh band (Sikh), Kalinka (European), Zingara (world/gypsy), Howlin’ Wind Band (world/rock) and accompanied Zulya Kamalova, Kavisha Mazzella, Bronwyn Calcutt, Gypsy Fire – Matthew Fagan, Texicali Rose (mariachi) Colin Reid, Brahim Benim (Moroccan), Afandi Siyo (Oromo/East African). As a classical musician, Ernie led the Monash String Quartet for 10 years and was an orchestral violinist.
His theatre involvement and collaborations include Melbourne Playback Theatre, Cafe Scheherezade, Progress and Melancholy, Our Chalk Circle, Dante, Russian Soup , Emma Celebrazione, Blue Absinthe and cabaret with Jugularity.

Hope Csutoros (violin, viola) (left hand side of photo)
Hope Csutoros studied at the Victorian College of the Arts and the Budapest Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Hungary. Performances and touring overseas includes My Friend the Chocolate Cake, Stiletto Sisters, Circus Oz, State Orchestra of Victoria, Phantom of the the Opera, David Chesworth Ensemble, Chamber Made Opera, and Deflocked String Quartet. Her recording credits include Midnight Oil, Deborah Conway, Mark Seymour and Renee Geyer.

Helen Mountfort (cello) (centre of photo)
Helen Mountfort performs with Fine Blue Thread, Cosmo Cosmolino and Not Drowning, Waving. She was a member of DeFlocked, improvising string quartet, and also David Chesworth Ensemble and My Friend The Chocolate Cake. She has recorded with many Australian artists including Missy Higgins, Archie Roach, Paul Kelly, Midnight Oil, Renee Geyer, Mark Seymour and the John Butler Trio.

SPECIAL GUESTS—BOWLINES CD LAUNCH

Adam Simmons (saxophone)
A virtuoso player of saxophones, clarinets, flute and shakuhachi (Japanese flute), Adam Simmons stretches the boundaries of modern composition and infuses a sense of wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. His performances are not so much ‘concerts’ as staged auditory spectacles—drawing audiences in to share in the uniquely communal power and euphoria of his music and art. He has a rare and uncanny ability to elicit the very best from the highly accomplished musicians he works with, as well as evoking spine-tingling emotion and rapturous applause from audiences.

Karen Berger (hang drum)
Karen has worked in Australia, Asia, Africa and Europe as a director, musical director, actor and musician. Career highlights include: devising and performing in an Edinburgh Festival Fringe First winning show, Believer (1992); improvising fairy stories for Bosnian children in Slovenian refugee camps (1993); musical directing and performing in a dance/music piece at the Melbourne City Baths, Walk on Water (2000); devising and directing a West African tour of Ashanti short stories, Who Stole Daawa’s Tail? (2004); playing teapot for the Melbourne International Arts Festival and Singapore International Children’s Festival in the Teapot Ensemble of Australia (2007) and co-directing ‘Forest Beats’, an outdoor circus show with 300 Zambian street children (2013).
Last year she was commissioned by the Dandenong Ranges Music Council to compose Bells of Peace for the Federation Bells at Birrarung Marr.
The original Hang (meaning ‘hand’ in Bernese German) was created in Switzerland in 2000. It uses some of the same basic physical principles as a steelpan, but modified in such a way as to act as a Helmholtz resonator – i.e. Air resonance in a cavity. Each note has a complex range of harmonics.

Travel Art Dance Company
Founded in 2003, Travel Art Dance Company brings together dancers from a range of dance and movement backgrounds, with the motivation behind the group being the combination of choreographed and improvised dance in a performance context. The experience of the dancers in the group ranges from contemporary dance, classical ballet, improvisation and creative dance to yoga, gymnastics, acrobalance, circus skills and martial arts.

Melbourne Playback Theatre Company
Melbourne Playback is a leading interactive theatre company that has been creating performances, professional training and workshops which transform, empower and entertain for over 30 years. They use personal story and the principles of improvisation as ways to awaken new perspectives.


NOT ALL WHO WONDER ARE LAST—CD DETAILS

by Bowlines
Release date: October 2018
Name of album : Not All Who Wonder Are Last
Artist : Bowlines
Musicians: Ernie Gruner (violin, viola, octave violin), Helen Mountfort (cello), Hope Csutoros (violin, viola)
Genre/s : World / improvised / art music / strings / classical
Recorded: Live at Northcote Uniting Church, Victoria, Australia, 30 October 2016
Recorded by: Nao Anzai and Yasutomo Umeki
Mixed & mastered by : Nao Anzai, Toys Of Noise
Australian distribution : Readings Carlton (309 Lygon St, Carlton), Captain Stomp (46 Forest Rd, Ferntree Gully) and L’Espresso Ballarat (417 Sturt St)
Via Ernie Gruner ernie@erniegruner.com ($20 inc postage within Aus)
Digital: https://bowlines.bandcamp.com/
Label : Independent
Cover art : Jamie de Rooij, DesignCrowd
CD layout : Implant Media
Photography : Rowan Gruner, Shawket Husseini
CD and track titles by: Niki Na Meadhra, storyteller

Track list :

  1. The Question Is The Key 3:14
  2. Rowing Into Sunlight 1:41
  3. The Traveller’s Dog 0:33
  4. Over The Hills To Faraway 0:33
  5. Unexpected Descent 0:33
  6. The Asking 3:16
  7. When Every Door Is Closed 2:51
  8. The Crone’s Advice 3:44
  9. The Horse Knows The Path Through 3:27
  10. Defeated By The Journey 3:37
  11. The Veil Is A Door 3:22
  12. Return To Home And Hearth 3:30
  13. A Home Outgrown 6:22
  14. Learning To Walk In New Shoes 4:44
Bowlines CD cover art

Wangaratta announces US jazz singer, Vivian Sessoms

Legendary US jazz chanteuse, Vivian Sessoms, will join the 29th Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues’ world-class line-up, Festival Chairman Mark Bolsius announced today.
With unrivalled backing vocalist credits including Chaka Khan, Donna Summer, Cher, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Pink, Patti Austin and a host of other headline artists, Ms Sessoms is launching her new album, LIFE, in November.
Not only will she perform a hotly-anticipated show at the WPAC Hall with US bassist and MD Chris Parks and Melbourne pianist Brenton Foster, but she’ll also appear with Australian all-female supergroup Sweethearts for one show only.
Geelong-based Sweethearts is an original soul, funk and blues band of young women that has earned critical acclaim worldwide, through regular appearances at Montreaux Jazz Festival, Jazz à Vienne, the Porretta Soul Festival, and more. The announcement of the Sweethearts—Vivian Sessoms performance comes after the unfortunate cancellation of US drummer, Bernard Purdie, who was scheduled to appear with Sweethearts but withdrew due to scheduling issues.
Securing Ms Sessoms’ appearances is a major coup for the festival, which is renowned for featuring the world’s most accomplished international and Australian jazz and blues artists each year, in the heart of north-east Victoria’s famous wine-producing region.
Ms Sessoms recorded and produced her forthcoming release LIFE in collaboration with multi-instrumentalist Chris Parks, displaying adventurous arrangements and an expressive, sophisticated sound that draws on jazz, R&B and pop in fresh and moving ways. Whether she’s presenting her own material, reinterpreting Strange Fruit for our own troubled times, or reshaping classic pop, jazz and soul hits, the result is nothing short of transformational. Her soaring voice is full and robust, unerring in pitch, utterly at home, and highly praised by Rolling Stone, Billboard, Ebony and other illustrious publications.


Since 1989 the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues has grown to become an internationally renowned event attracting around 25,000 visitors and 200+ jazz and blues artists from the US, the UK, Europe and Australia to regional north-east Victoria every November. With its diverse mix of jazz greats and rising stars, each year the program showcases jazz and blues of all styles, including original, contemporary, traditional, mainstream, experimental and improvised. A central feature remains the National Jazz Awards; a competition designed to encourage and promote young musicians. The Festival has won numerous tourism and sponsorship awards, and is recognised internationally as the foremost jazz and blues event in Australia.
Ends/ends…


WFoJ Logo with Date - large - Copy

Mission Songs Project songbook to be launched at spectacular massed choir concerts

Jessie Lloyd’s acclaimed Mission Songs Project is taking a major step towards becoming an established part of the Australian folk songbook, with the launch of the Mission Songs Project Choir Songbook.

In an inspired collaboration between Jessie and Melbourne’s renowned Boîte Millennium Chorus, the rare secular songs that were once performed on Aboriginal missions have been arranged for choirs and will be sung by a mass choir of 200 voices at the Melbourne Town Hall on Sunday 12 August at 2.30pm.

Directed by Indigenous opera singer and musician, Jessica Hitchcock (Short Black Opera, Kate Miller-Heidke band) and accompanied by professional musicians, the choir will perform the incredibly moving songs of loss, love and longing that have been recently re-discovered by Jessie Lloyd in her field research, family conversations, and musical touring.

Reaching back to the early 1900s, the songs chronicle Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander life on the missions to which they were removed, after being forcibly taken from their families. And although profound grief and loss lie beneath many of the songs, the lyrics, melodies and instrumentation are universally uplifting, and many are tinged with dry humour.


These unique songs consist of almost-forgotten stories that shed light into the history of our Indigenous elders, families and communities, and explore day-to-day life in the missions. They include Own Native Land, written by Jessie’s Grandfather Albie Geia, which is a plea to end his slavery and have his land returned; Down In The Kitchen by Jessie’s Grandmother Alma Geia, a wry statement on the parlous state of mission food; and the famous war-time song Now Is The Hour, known also as the Maori farewell, adapted and given more spiritual lyrics on the missions.

Mission Songs Project Choir Songbook 2018

The beautifully-illustrated 80-page songbook includes sheet music, chords, lyrics and arrangements for vocal parts in soprano, alto, tenor and bass and lead vocal, as well as the story behind each song. It promises to become a valuable resource for choir leaders, schools, musicologists, musicians and people wishing to learn more about the lives of Indigenous Australians and the songs they sang.

Boîte Director, Roger King OAM, said the Boîte was thrilled to be working with Jessie and her Mission Songs Project, and helping to share these culturally-significant songs with a wider audience.
“We’re honoured to be partnering with Jessie to produce the first Mission Songs Project Choir Songbook, and launch it through these special concerts,” he said. “We have our 200-voice adult choir performing at the Melbourne Town Hall, as well as Schools Chorus concerts in Melbourne, Ballarat and Albury; this is our most extensive concert program to date, and one that we hope will resonate with all our audiences.”

In addition to the one-off Millennium Chorus concert on August 12, the Boîte Schools Chorus of 1,000 school children across Victoria will perform the Mission Songs at five separate concerts in Melbourne, Ballarat and Albury/Wodonga.

BMC18 Front 2

About the Boîte Millennium Chorus

The Boîte Millennium Chorus started in 1999 as a one-off major celebration to usher in the 2000s and highlight the work of The Boîte in bringing culturally diverse music and musicians to Australian audiences. It was so successful, and the audience response so overwhelmingly positive, that The Boîte arranged another concert the following year. Since then the choir has grown to become the most popular, anticipated and well-attended concert in The Boîte’s packed world music event calendar.
The Chorus is a major community engagement project that creates opportunities for Victorian singers and audiences of all ages to participate in a large-scale arts event. The project is socially inclusive and accessible to people of all genders, ethnicities and abilities. The regional choir program ensures that singers from across the state can learn repertoire, engage with other cultures within Melbourne’s community and from across the world, as well as perform in a grand concert at a prestigious venue. It addresses the human need to participate in the arts and storytelling, celebrates Australia’s cultural diversity, and supports the wealth of musical talent in our community.
The Boîte Millennium Chorus is supported by Creative Victoria.


About the Boîte Schools Chorus

The Boîte Schools Chorus is a unique non-auditioned choir project for schools and community youth choirs, and is one of the only non-competitive inter-school activities that school children can participate in. It invites students into a new world through song, builds confidence, broadens horizons and develops valuable performance and interpersonal skills. Since 2004, the Boite Schools Chorus has involved over 9200 students from across Victoria in 42 concerts in Melbourne, Frankston, Ballarat, Bairnsdale and Albury. Each year the chorus focuses on a different cultural theme, which has included Africa, Pacific Islands, Seychelles, East Timor, South America and Indigenous Australia.


BIOS

Jessica Hitchcock (Choir director)
Melbourne-based, with family origins from Saibai in the Torres Straits and Papua New Guinea, singer/songwriter Jessica Hitchcock is an up-and-coming Indigenous singer, musician, composer and director.
Jessica transitioned from a jazz background into the world of opera, when she joined Deborah Cheetham’s Short Black Opera Company as an artist and teacher. This led to the opportunity to sing a lead role in Opera Australia’s production of The Rabbits, for which she was awarded a prestigious Green Room Award for Best Female in a supporting role in 2016.
The role of ‘Alice’ in Pecan Summer was her debut professional opera production, for which she won a Broadway World award for best supporting actress in an opera, at the Sydney Opera House in 2017.
She sang on Jessie Lloyd’s acclaimed Mission Songs Project album, and has since performed at major festivals and concerts around Australia as one of the main vocalists for this project. Jessica has also recently been touring as Kate Miller-Heidke’s backing vocalist and pianist, and recently released a book of Indigenous Children’s choral music with Deborah Cheetham OA and Short Black Opera.

Jessie Lloyd (Artistic Director)
Originally from the tropics of North Queensland, Jessie Lloyd is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musician, composer, band leader, producer, director, curator and musicologist.
She is a cultural practitioner of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music, and is dedicated to the continuation of cultural traditions through the presentation of contemporary and traditional Indigenous music.
From the Bass Strait to the Torres Strait and across the Arafura Sea, Jessie has travelled Australia and spent time with senior song men and women, uncovering precious stories and songs from the mission days.
Jessie launched the Mission Songs Project CD and concerts in 2017 to widespread acclaim. Her extensive research, musical training and family connections (her father is music pioneer, Joe Geia), as well as her Indigenous background, made her uniquely placed to uncover a precious part of our history: secular songs that were sung after church, and that explore the day to day life of the mission days across Australia, from cultural identity to love and loss. These unique songs consist of almost forgotten stories that now shed light into the history of our Indigenous elders, families and communities.

Roger King OAM (Boite Director)
From his childhood in South Africa to working as an engineer in Malaysia and on the Snowy Mountains Hydro Electric Project among a diverse multicultural workforce, Roger developed a deep and abiding interest in different cultures. He has a profound respect for the wisdom and generosity of peoples in humble circumstances, and a lifelong passion for music from all corners of the world.
In 1984, he and his partner, Therese Virtue, began coordinating The Boîte, a pioneering multicultural arts organisation that celebrates and supports cultural diversity through music. The Boîte has forged meaningful relationships with countless musicians, artists, dancers, writers and storytellers; presented thousands of events, from concerts in Hamer Hall to street songs in the back lanes of Fitzroy; and encouraged people of all ages to attend concerts, join choirs and participate in musical and vocal workshops. The Boîte facilitates creative spaces for people from many different communities, including artists who have been forced to flee from their homeland, offering friendship and support.
In 1999 Roger and Therese worked with choir director Melanie Shanahan to create the inaugural Boîte Melbourne Millennium Chorus. The concert received rave reviews and has since been the organisation’s premier annual event.
Roger is also a keen singer, performing with Gorani, a 10-voice men’s ensemble specialising in traditional village songs from Georgia and Bulgaria and appearing on national radio and TV in Georgia, Bulgaria and Australia.
In 2006, Roger and Therese were each awarded a Medal of the Order of Australia, Roger for service to the community as a director and instigator of multicultural music events, and Therese for service to the community as a manager and presenter of multicultural music and media programs.

Mission Songs Project background
Jessie Lloyd’s profoundly moving and important Mission Songs Project reveals what daily life was like for Indigenous Australians on Christian missions and state-run settlements. Through the discovery of rare secular songs that were sung after church, audiences can gain a deeper understanding about the history of elders, families and communities, from cultural identity to love and loss.
Mission Songs Project is an initiative to revive contemporary Australian Indigenous songs from 1900 to 1999, focusing on the Christian missions, state run settlements and native camps where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were relocated.
Searching for the secular songs that were sung after church, Mission Songs Project looks to explore the day to day life of the mission days, from cultural identity to love and loss. These unique songs consist of almost forgotten stories that can now shed light into the history of our Indigenous elders, families and communities.
Mission Songs Project faithfully explores the musical journey of Indigenous Australian music as Jessie Lloyd connects the traditional with contemporary, revealing the continuation of cultural practice and song traditions into the 21st Century.
An award winning composer, performer and creative entrepreneur, Jessie Lloyd is a cultural practitioner of Indigenous music and song. Dedicated to the continuation of story and song through the performance of Indigenous music, Jessie has travelled Australia in search of hidden songs to present this rare and unique Indigenous narrative.

29th Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues announces inspired world-class program

Australia’s foremost jazz and blues music festival, Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, to be held from Friday 2nd through Sunday 4th November in Wangaratta, north-east Victoria, has announced a stunning program of international and Australian artists to tempt travellers, lovers of live music and locals alike.
This year’s program is the most internationally-diverse in the festival’s history, with the likes of electrifying UK blues guitarist Matt Schofield, US ‘sonic explorers’ FORQ, German jazz-hip-hop piano group Trio ELF, and, in a welcome return to Wangaratta for the first time since 2010, the Netherlands’ Yuri Honing Quartet.
And the local line-up promises to be stronger and more inspiring than ever, featuring the world premiere of the Australian Art Orchestra’s new work, revered Indigenous Australian jazz vocalist Wilma Reading, all-female soul band Sweethearts, Ray Beadle coming out of retirement to perform on both jazz and blues stages with Clayton Doley and Red Hands, and Tina Harrod performing her lauded new album, City of Longing, as well as guest-starring on the beloved annual Jazz Mass program.
Festival Chair Mark Bolsius praised the artistic team—Zoe Hauptmann, Frank Davidson, Scott Solimo and Adam Simmons—for creating a program jam-packed with fresh new faces, venerable favourites and award-winning musicians from the UK, US, France, Japan, Indonesia, the Czech Republic, India, The Netherlands, Asia, Germany, Sri Lanka, Canada and Australia.
“This year really builds on the successful rebirth of the festival in 2017, when our new venues, partnerships, precinct layout and programming team were universally endorsed by audiences, artists and music critics,” Mr Bolsius said.
“Not only do we have the most diverse international line-up ever, but we continue to offer a world-class Australian line-up, something that is unique to this festival. With more than 300 musicians in over 80 concerts across eight concert locations, we promise there’s something for everyone. We’re confident that we have the right mix of music, artists, stages and programming to satisfy and delight not just serious jazz and blues aficionados, but also tourists to northeast Victoria and of course our local music-lovers.”


Artist highlights include:

  • UK blues guitarist, Matt Schofield, whose virtuoso playing has seen him named as one of the top 10 British Blues Guitarists of all time and inducted into the British Blues Hall of Fame;
  • World-class sonic improvisers, FORQ, from the US, featuring keyboardist Henry Hey (David Bowie, Empire of the Sun) and bassist Michael League (Grammy-winning leader of Snarky Puppy) and touring their third album Thrēq;
  • Vocalist Wilma Reading, whose numerous international career highlights include touring with the Duke Ellington Orchestra, performing on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, lead roles on London’s West End, and featuring at New York’s Copacabana Night Club;
  • From The Netherlands, the Yuri Honing Quartet, in a welcome return to Wangaratta for the first time since 2010, this time with an acclaimed new album, Goldbrun;
  • The world premiere of a new work by the Australian Art Orchestra—a contemplation of the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day in music by Andrea Keller, Peter Knight and Tilman Robinson;
  • A slew of inspired local/overseas collaborations including The Three Seas, a cross-cultural and cross-genre collaboration between musicians from India and Australia;
    The new Victorian Youth Jazz Collective, led by James Mustafa, paving the way for a whole new generation of young jazz musicians;
  • Opelousas, a new blues collaboration between Kerri Simpson, Alison Ferrier and Anthony ‘Shorty’ Shortte of Collard Greens and Gravy fame;
  • Ex-Canberra guitarist, Alex Stuart, touring with his French quintet;
  • Wild woman of blues and 2017-18 MBAS Blues Performer of The Year, Kelly Auty, performing her new all-original blues album, Kelly’s Blues;
  • The Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble with the Afrolankan Drumming System (Ray Pereira) and Indian dancer Vikram Iyengar performing The Calling;
  • 2017 National Jazz Award winner, James Macaulay, with the Hishakaku Quartet;
  • Triple J Unearthed indie-jazz-roots darlings, JAKAL, with Jessie Hillel (NZ) on vocals;
  • A rare performance by jazz royalty, Ten Part Invention, celebrating over 30 years of creating music. The festival is thrilled to have on the bill this ‘small big band’ of virtuoso composer-improvisers, described one the Radio National Music Show as “one of the most expressive large ensembles to emerge from Australia”.


Since 1989 the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues grown to become an internationally renowned event attracting around 25,000 visitors and 200 jazz and blues artists from the US, the UK, Europe and Australia to regional north-east Victoria every November.
With a diverse, eclectic mix of jazz greats and rising stars, each year the program showcases jazz and blues of all styles, including original, contemporary, traditional, mainstream, experimental and improvised. A central feature remains the National Jazz Awards; a competition designed to encourage and promote young musicians. The Festival has won numerous tourism and sponsorship awards, and is recognised internationally as the foremost jazz and blues event in Australia.

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