Media release: 29th Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues announces inspired world-class program

Australia’s foremost jazz and blues music festival, Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, to be held from Friday 2nd through Sunday 4th November in Wangaratta, north-east Victoria, has announced a stunning program of international and Australian artists to tempt travellers, lovers of live music and locals alike.
This year’s program is the most internationally-diverse in the festival’s history, with the likes of electrifying UK blues guitarist Matt Schofield, US ‘sonic explorers’ FORQ, German jazz-hip-hop piano group Trio ELF, and, in a welcome return to Wangaratta for the first time since 2010, the Netherlands’ Yuri Honing Quartet.
And the local line-up promises to be stronger and more inspiring than ever, featuring the world premiere of the Australian Art Orchestra’s new work, revered Indigenous Australian jazz vocalist Wilma Reading, all-female soul band Sweethearts, Ray Beadle coming out of retirement to perform on both jazz and blues stages with Clayton Doley and Red Hands, and Tina Harrod performing her lauded new album, City of Longing, as well as guest-starring on the beloved annual Jazz Mass program.
Festival Chair Mark Bolsius praised the artistic team—Zoe Hauptmann, Frank Davidson, Scott Solimo and Adam Simmons—for creating a program jam-packed with fresh new faces, venerable favourites and award-winning musicians from the UK, US, France, Japan, Indonesia, the Czech Republic, India, The Netherlands, Asia, Germany, Sri Lanka, Canada and Australia.
“This year really builds on the successful rebirth of the festival in 2017, when our new venues, partnerships, precinct layout and programming team were universally endorsed by audiences, artists and music critics,” Mr Bolsius said.
“Not only do we have the most diverse international line-up ever, but we continue to offer a world-class Australian line-up, something that is unique to this festival. With more than 300 musicians in over 80 concerts across eight concert locations, we promise there’s something for everyone. We’re confident that we have the right mix of music, artists, stages and programming to satisfy and delight not just serious jazz and blues aficionados, but also tourists to northeast Victoria and of course our local music-lovers.”


Artist highlights include:

  • UK blues guitarist, Matt Schofield, whose virtuoso playing has seen him named as one of the top 10 British Blues Guitarists of all time and inducted into the British Blues Hall of Fame;
  • World-class sonic improvisers, FORQ, from the US, featuring keyboardist Henry Hey (David Bowie, Empire of the Sun) and bassist Michael League (Grammy-winning leader of Snarky Puppy) and touring their third album Thrēq;
  • Vocalist Wilma Reading, whose numerous international career highlights include touring with the Duke Ellington Orchestra, performing on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, lead roles on London’s West End, and featuring at New York’s Copacabana Night Club;
  • From The Netherlands, the Yuri Honing Quartet, in a welcome return to Wangaratta for the first time since 2010, this time with an acclaimed new album, Goldbrun;
  • The world premiere of a new work by the Australian Art Orchestra—a contemplation of the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day in music by Andrea Keller, Peter Knight and Tilman Robinson;
  • A slew of inspired local/overseas collaborations including The Three Seas, a cross-cultural and cross-genre collaboration between musicians from India and Australia;
    The new Victorian Youth Jazz Collective, led by James Mustafa, paving the way for a whole new generation of young jazz musicians;
  • Opelousas, a new blues collaboration between Kerri Simpson, Alison Ferrier and Anthony ‘Shorty’ Shortte of Collard Greens and Gravy fame;
  • Ex-Canberra guitarist, Alex Stuart, touring with his French quintet;
  • Wild woman of blues and 2017-18 MBAS Blues Performer of The Year, Kelly Auty, performing her new all-original blues album, Kelly’s Blues;
  • The Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble with the Afrolankan Drumming System (Ray Pereira) and Indian dancer Vikram Iyengar performing The Calling;
  • 2017 National Jazz Award winner, James Macaulay, with the Hishakaku Quartet;
  • Triple J Unearthed indie-jazz-roots darlings, JAKAL, with Jessie Hillel (NZ) on vocals;
  • A rare performance by jazz royalty, Ten Part Invention, celebrating over 30 years of creating music. The festival is thrilled to have on the bill this ‘small big band’ of virtuoso composer-improvisers, described one the Radio National Music Show as “one of the most expressive large ensembles to emerge from Australia”.

Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues, Friday 2nd to Sunday 4th November 2018
Artist details and program grid
Follow @WangarattaJazz on Twitter, @wangarattajazzandblues on Instagram and @WangarattaJazzFestival on Facebook
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Since 1989 the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues grown to become an internationally renowned event attracting around 25,000 visitors and 200 jazz and blues artists from the US, the UK, Europe and Australia to regional north-east Victoria every November.
With a diverse, eclectic mix of jazz greats and rising stars, each year the program showcases jazz and blues of all styles, including original, contemporary, traditional, mainstream, experimental and improvised. A central feature remains the National Jazz Awards; a competition designed to encourage and promote young musicians. The Festival has won numerous tourism and sponsorship awards, and is recognised internationally as the foremost jazz and blues event in Australia.

WFoJ Logo with Date - large - Copy

Music Moments Memories

Media release: Adam Simmons + Wang Zheng-Ting in world premiere of The Kites of Tianjin

REVIEWS

Adam Simmons: The Kites of Tianjin
★★★★★ Raphael Solarsh, Arts Hub
“… a fitting finale to the inimitable brilliance of The Usefulness of Art concert series by Adam Simmons.”
“The Usefulness of Art has been a ground-breaking and magnificent musical journey. Simmons and his collaborators have plotted a singularly innovative and evocative trail that has taken audience to the far-flung corners of the world with Simmons’ exquisite sonic journals. Each concert has offered not just music inspired by place but deeply personal narratives seamlessly intertwined.”
“… Adam Simmons is producing some of the most incredible jazz in Australia or anywhere else.”

Adam Simmons, The Kites of Tianjin
★★★★½ Des Cowley, Australian Books and Arts Review
“The extended applause that greeted the performance’s end seemed like a recognition of the monumentality of Adam Simmons’ Usefulness of Art series. Inspired by a direct quote from Rodin, ‘I call useful all that gives happiness’, his cycle of large-scale compositions has raised fundamental questions about the role of art in our society, and the ways in which art might bring us together. For this occasion, the performances by Wang Zheng-Ting and members of the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble were flawless. For those of us fortunate enough to have attended the series, there was a sense that, for composer and audience alike, we had reached the end of a long and fascinating journey. And, like any journey, we had arrived changed from when we set out.”

Kites Soar on Breath of Life
★★★★½ Jessica Nicholas, The Age & Sydney Morning Herald
“…Simmons has used [The Usefulness of Art series] to explore the value of music and art in shaping identity and fostering a sense of community.”
“… the exceptional artistry of sheng player Wang Zheng Ting […] the sheng flutters and dances with the delicacy of butterfly wings, though it can also pulse with rhythmic vitality.”
“…Simmons uses his instruments and… his entire 15-piece Creative Music Ensemble… to draw parallels between music and nature, art and pleasure.”
“The Kites of Tianjin is all about wind and its relationship to breath – and breath to life – and as the piece comes to an end, the musicians put down their instruments and simply breathe. Simmons looks out at us, issuing a gentle invitation to breathe with them. It’s a simple but deeply moving gesture, signifying the inclusiveness and desire to share that makes Simmons’ work so meaningful.”

Wind as Breath, Breath as Life
—Roger Mitchell, Ausjazz.net
“Breathtakingly beautiful…the ending also draws the audience in to share and engage with the ensemble, but in a totally different way. We gradually become aware that the music is becoming breath-like and, in an utterly magic experience, realise as the music fades that all that remains is the breathing. Like gentle waves washing on a sea shore the breathing takes us to an utterly restful and peaceful place. Instead of our breath being taken, we are filled with and enlivened by our own breathing. Don’t miss the chance to hear this concert.”


MEDIA RELEASE

Acclaimed Melbourne composer, Adam Simmons, will perform the world premiere of his latest new musical work, The Kites of Tianjin, at fortyfivedownstairs from Thursday 26 to Sunday 29 July.
Inspired by Simmons’ experiences in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin, famous for its Wei Kites, The Kites of Tianjin will feature Wang Zheng-Ting on Sheng (Chinese mouth organ) as featured soloist with the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble.
The Kites of Tianjin will be the fifth and final concert in Simmons’ acclaimed The Usefulness of Art series. Comprising five unique and original concerts over 2017-18, The Usefulness of Art originated from a quote by Auguste Rodin, and is the driving force behind Simmons’ formidable musical career.
Since meeting in 2007, Simmons and Ting have collaborated on a number of major concerts as a duo and with Simmons’s trio, Origami. The two were intrigued by the Wei Kites during a visit to Tianjin in 2017, where they attended a workshop run by Wei Guoqiu, a fourth-generation member of the famous kite-making family.
“There’s something irresistible about making your own kite… and about finding the way to ride the wind. It’s similar to playing with nature in other ways, such as creating sand tunnels at the beach or floating sticks down the river or stoking the hot coals to produce flames,” says Simmons.
“A kite is brought to life by the wind—and we in turn rely on breathing to give us life. This invisible force around us has such potential for creation and sustenance. My personal revelation a few years back is that really what I have been learning via my musical instruments is fundamentally about how to breathe—and that to breathe is to live. In this way, the kite in the wind becomes a metaphor for living.”
The Kites of Tianjin—which musically and visually explores breath and the fundamental nature of being human—is the culmination of the preceding Usefulness of Art concerts. Together, the concerts have used Simmons’ original art music to ponder such weighty concepts as the creation of form, art through music, qualities that art engenders in humanity, reasons to create art, how art connects communities and helps develop understanding of one’s place in the world, exploring personal identity, and connecting to place.
The first four concerts have elicited rapturous praise from critics and audiences alike, including The Age’s Jessica Nicholas: “… another marvellously assured step in Simmons’ own journey as musician and composer, and a potent demonstration of the usefulness – no, the necessity – of art as an expression of our collective humanity,” and “(The Calling was) arresting both musically and visually, reflecting the sense of empathy and shared experience that gives this work such a strong emotional resonance.”
Two 5-star reviews by Raphael Solarsh of Arts Hub effused: “… (a) sonic freefall into a raw and emotive tour de force… another masterpiece by Simmons and his collaborators,” and “Simmons’ music is rich and evocative with the cinematic string arrangement given a grittier and more tactile edge by saxophony that spanned subtle breath all the way to unrestrained wail.”

This concert is supported by the City of Melbourne Arts Grants Program.


THE KITES OF TIANJIN—BIOS

Adam Simmons
A virtuoso player of saxophones, clarinets, flute and shakuhachi (Japanese flute), Adam Simmons stretches the boundaries of modern composition and infuses a sense of wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. His performances are not so much ‘concerts’ as staged auditory spectacles—drawing audiences in to share in the uniquely communal power and euphoria of his music and art. He has a rare and uncanny ability to elicit the very best from the highly accomplished musicians he works with, as well as evoking spine-tingling emotion and rapturous applause from audiences.
His concerts are joyous, inspired cross-genre collaborations with virtuoso musicians and theatrical artists. Previous concerts have involved not only his eclectic Creative Music Ensemble (in which his father, Paul Simmons, plays saxophone) but also artists of the calibre of Michael Kieran Harvey, the Arcko Symphonic Ensemble, and Diokno Pasilan.
Adam is the lead Co-Artistic Director of Wangaratta Festival of Jazz & Blues. He was also selected for the 2017 intake for Australia Council’s Arts Leader Program.

Wang Zheng-Ting
Wang Zheng-Ting is a world-renowned musician (Sheng, Chinese mouth organ), musical director, lecturer, author and ethnomusicologist. He graduated from Shanghai Music Conservatory and completed an MA in Ethnomusicology at Monash University and a PhD in Ethnomusicology at the University of Melbourne, and is an honorary research fellow at Monash University.
He co-ordinated the Chinese Instrumental Music course at the University of Melbourne, was a Melbourne Festival Ambassador in 2014 and 2015, and has been invited as a visiting scholar to the City University of New York, guest professor at Xiamen University, and Research Fellow at the Sichuan Conservatory of Music. He is director of the Australian Chinese Music Ensemble.
As a lecturer and solo performer on the Sheng (Chinese mouth organ), he has performed recitals across the world including the US (New York Lincoln Center, University of California), and in Zurich, Germany, Thailand, Tokyo, Holland, China and Italy. His book, Chinese Music in Australia: Victoria, 1850s to mid-1990s was published in 1997.

The Adam Simmons Creative Ensemble (ASCME)
The ASCME first performed in 2004 at the Sydney Opera House for the Freedman Awards, resulting in a Special Award from the Freedman Foundation being awarded to Simmons for his work. Since then the group has performed at Melbourne Jazz Fringe Festival, Festival Of Slow Music and Wentworth Arts Festival, as well as being recorded by ABC FM at the Half Bent Music Festival. ASCME combines the outstanding talents of musicians from diverse backgrounds, performing cross-genre music that connects, engages and resonates powerfully with audiences. The ensemble has also performed in three of The Usefulness of Art concerts so far, and for the Kites of Tianjin will comprise:
Leader/woodwinds—Adam Simmons
Saxophones—Samuel Boon (Saskwatch), Cara Taber (Esstee Big Band), Gideon Brazil (Gotye, The Rockets), Paul Simmons (Adam’s father, from Ballarat; The Parrots inc. David Hobson, Kamahl, Dolphy’s Albatross)
Trumpets—Gemma Horbury (Orkeztra Glasso Bashalde, Tek Tek Ensemble), Gavin Cornish (Movin’ & Groovin’ Orchestra)
Trombones—James Wilkinson (Snuff Puppets), Bryn Hills (from Ballarat; The Boxing Tostados)
Bass—Howard Cairns (Origami, Way Out West)
Drums—Niko Schauble (Australian Art Orchestra, Tibetan Dixie)
Percussion—Nat Grant (The Amplified Elephants), Carmen Chan (Do You See What I Hear?)
Guitar—David Brown (bucketrider, Pateras/Baxter/Brown, Candlesnuffer)
Vocals—Pete Lawler (Weddings Parties Anything, RRR BBQ Orchestra)

THE KITES OF TIANJIN—COSTUMES
Fashion/costumier—Christine Crawshaw (Ballarat; BOLT Ensemble, Ballarat Heritage Festival)
Christine Crawshaw is a Ballarat-based freelance designer for events involving set dressing, display, costuming for events, weddings and theatre. With a background in visual arts (Victorian Collage of the Arts and Ballarat University College) Christine has worked with performers in live music and festivals for over 20 years, including BOLT Ensemble, Festival of Slow Music, Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble and Harvest Festival (Buninyong).

THE KITES OF TIANJIN—SET DESIGN
Set designer—Rachaeldaisy
Award-winning quilting artist Rachaeldaisy (Rachael Simmons, Springwood, NSW) has become synonymous with bold, colourful, highly detailed quilts. While honouring the age-old tradition of quilting, Rachaeldaisy constantly creates fresh ways and techniques to interpret conventional designs. Her use of 3D elements such as folded and gathered fabric techniques, yoyo puffs, prairie points, wool felt, appliqué denim and crochet doilies, as well as her mastery of colour and form, make for unique, exquisitely textural work. Rachaeldaisy’s quilts have been exhibited in national and international quilt shows and galleries. Rachaeldaisy is Adam Simmons’s sister.
https://www.instagram.com/bluemountaindaisy/

THE KITES OF TIANJIN—VISUALS
Visual designer—Jean Poole
Jean Poole is a Melbourne-based video artist, specialising in live projections, though extending to animation, music video direction and installation design. Jean has designed live visual sets for artists such as Gotye, Cumbia Cosmonauts and Cleverhorse. He has been commissioned to create and control projection mapped video environments for the MONA museum’s annual MOFO and Dark MOFO festivals.
His fascination with the possibilities of real-time video manipulation – has seen him projecting video onto 100-million-year-old dinosaur skeletons onto car wrecks in the Australian desert, onto Turkey’s Cappadocia cliffs, and onto masked wrestlers on rooftops in Mexico. This passion for shaping atmospheres with video, has also found him controlling multi-screened and projection mapped video for theatre, and accompanying musicians at the Sydney Opera House, ACMI, the OK Video festival in Jakarta, Indonesia, the LPM festival in Rome, Italy, and at Australian festivals such as Big Day Out, Meredith Music Festival, Electrofringe, Stereosonic, Golden Plains, Good Vibrations, Melbourne International Jazz festival and Falls Festival.

THE KITES OF TIANJIN—Other points of interest
Tianjin
With a population of more than 15 million, the northern coastal city of Tianjin is the fourth largest city in China. In 1980, Melbourne and Tianjin formed a sister city relationship—the first such relationship between an Australian and a Chinese city. In 1998, the Melbourne Office opened in Tianjin to facilitate trade, investment and exchanges between the two cities. The City of Melbourne remains the only Australian local government to have an established business office in China. Melbourne’s sister city relationship with Tianjin fosters understanding and goodwill between the two cities and recognises contributions made by the Chinese community to Melbourne’s business, culture and community life.

Wei Kites
Spring and autumn kite-making emerged as a traditional Chinese folk craft around 770 BC. In ancient China, kites were known as ‘paper eagles’ and used to measure distances and send signals, as well as for fun and recreation. Selecting the materials (silk, bamboo, and paper), designing, making and mastering the flying of these beautiful kites is a painstaking process.
The city of Tianjin is especially renowned for its kite craftsmen; the most famous of whom was Wei Yuantai, born in 1872. Nicknamed Kite Wei for his mastery of the craft, he made extraordinary kites for more than 70 years. Kite Wei created around 200 silk kites with many new designs, such as flat hard-winged, soft-winged, three-dimensional and foldaway kites, which have a flexible bamboo framework secured with glue instead of thread, and reinforced by a copper ring at every joint. Kite Wei passed on his craft to his family members, and today his great-great grandson Wei Guoqiu continues his kite-making tradition.


Previous concerts in The Usefulness of Art concert series:
Concert #4: The Calling (Adam Simmons with Afro-Lankan Drumming System)
Concert #3: Travelling Tales (Adam Simmons with Arcko Ensemble)
Concert #2: Meditation on The Usefulness of Art is music for our times (The Usefulness of Art, Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble)
Concert #1: Unique concert series to explore The Usefulness of Art (Concerto for Piano & Toy Band, Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble with Michael Kieran Harvey)

Media release: Deline Briscoe, Yalanji Woman of Song launches solo debut CD, Wawu

After 10 years touring the world as a principal artist with the Black Arm Band and performing with Archie Roach, Dr G Yunupingu and Jessie Lloyd’s Mission Songs Project, Yalanji woman of song Deline Briscoe has launched her stunning solo debut album, Wawu.
Wawu—a Yalanji word encompassing the concepts of spirit, heart, love and connections between people, land, past, present and future—tells the story of four generations of women from one family: Deline, her daughter Jade, her Mother and her Mother’s mother.
Sung in Yalanji language as well as English, the songs extend a gentle call to people struggling in life; an acknowledgement of their pain, and a tender reassurance that can only come from women who have risen, triumphant, from the darkest of times.
While the songs speak of the older women’s journeys through the trauma of separation from their families and of her own experience with abusive relationships, the mood of the album is compassionate and redemptive. In both subject and style, the album’s acoustic soul/hip-hop/jazz fusions draws parallels with Lauryn Hill’s groundbreaking The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.
Deline’s extraordinary, soulful and jazz-infused vocals are enriched by all-acoustic instruments brilliantly played by Airileke Ingram (drums), Robbie Finch (double bass), Stephen Maxwell (piano), Paul Coyle (trumpet) and Phil Bywater (clarinet/saxophone) as the core band.
Special guests include ARIA award-winning jazz pianist/composer Andrea Keller, with whom Deline co-wrote the exquisite Sonrise. Ignorance Is Bliss, written by Tiddas (Lou Bennett, Amy Saunders and Sally Dastey), is given a contemporary re-working and features the reunited Tiddas on harmony vocals. Deline’s 12-year-old daughter, Jade’Amali Leuga, lends her assured spoken-word vocals to In The Night. Sister songstresses from the Mission Songs Project, Jessie Lloyd, Jess Hitchcock and Emma Donovan, harmonise throughout.
In Ngadijina, a spoken-word piece, Deline recites her Nanna’s memories of witnessing her family being taken by police in the era of the first stolen generation (quoted verbatim from her Nanna’s interview for the Bringing Them Home report), while the ethereal Tree (co-written by Deline and Bart Willoughby, based on a poem and lyrics by Kevin Gilbert), is a hymn to creation and nature.
Wawu is the realisation of Deline’s creative vision, nurtured over the last 20 years. The launch concerts promise to capture the imaginations, hearts and ears of audiences—her album and show will be a spiritual experience as much as a musical journey.


INTERVIEWS
Saturday 30 June 2018—ABC Radio National, Awaye with Daniel Browning
Sunday 8 July 2018—ABC Radio National, The Music Show with Andrew Ford


DELINE BRISCOE—BIO
Deline Briscoe is an internationally acclaimed singer songwriter hailing from the Kuku Yalanji of far northern Australia. Her soulful intimate sound has defined her as one of Australia’s finest voices. A principal artist in Australia’s leading performing arts company Black Arm Band, Deline has performed to over one million people worldwide, alongside artists such as Archie Roach, Dr G Yunupingu, Tiddas, Emma Donovan, and Jessie Lloyd’s Mission Songs Project.
Showcasing her strong Indigenous heritage with songs in her mother tongue Gugu Yalanji of North Queensland, Deline’s progressive journey as a Yalanji songwoman upholds cultural song traditions through her language connection. As a mother, Deline also has an understanding of the beauty and pain of our human experience, her songs bring messages of love, hope and empowerment for women. With humble beginnings in the trio act Briscoe Sisters, Deline developed exceptional abilities in musical arrangements and compositions. Her unique sound is described as ‘Rainforest Soul’; acoustic roots with harmonies interweaving vocal lines that seamlessly move between traditional and modern songlines.
Deline Briscoe EPK


WAWU—CD DETAILS

Deline Briscoe solo debut CD, Wawu
Release date: July 2018
Name of album : Wawu
Artist : Deline Briscoe
Genre/s : Roots/Jazz/Acoustic Soul/Acoustic Hip hop/ Folk
Produced by : Deline Briscoe and Airileke
Engineered & mixed by : Colin Leadbetter, Sing Sing
Mastered by : Matthew Cunliffe
Australian distribution : MGM Online Distribution (digital)
https://www.delinebriscoe.com and live shows (hard copies)
Label : Independent
Publisher : Gaba Musik
CD Design : Lyn Geia
Photography : Peggy Kasabad
Weaving : Delissa Walker

Track list and song I.D.
01  Wawu  : 1:29 AUGGB1870001
02  Heartbeat   : 3:53 AUGGB1870002
03  Human Experience : 4:57 AUGGB1870003
04  Sonrise : 4:57 AUGGB1870004
05  Joe : 5:16 AUGGB1870005
06 Ignorance Is Bliss : 4:20 AUGGB1870006
07  Trust Us : 2:48 AUGGB1870007
08  Tree : 3:42 AUGGB1870008
09  Ngadijina : 1:07 AUGGB1870009
10  Sweet Frangipani : 5:04 AUGGB1870010
11  All Things Broken : 5:17 AUGGB1870011
12  In The Night : 2:46 AUGGB1870012
13  Need Your Love : 4:35 AUGGB1870013

Musicians (core band):
Airileke Ingram – Drums, Robbie Finch – Double Bass, Stephen Maxwell – Piano, Paul Coyle – trumpet, Phil Bywater – Clarinet/Saxophone

Guests artists include:
Andrea Keller (piano/composer); Tiddas (composers/harmony vocals); Emma Donovan, Jessie Lloyd and Jess Hitchcock (harmony vocals)

Musicians:

Wawu
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch

Heartbeat
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Harmony : Lou Bennett
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jessie Lloyd

Human Experience
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Clarinet : Phil Bywater
Trumpet : Paul Coyle
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock
Copyright : Deline Briscoe

Sonrise
Piano : Andrea Keller
Copyright : Briscoe/Keller

Joe
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Harmony : Jessie Lloyd
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jesica Hitchcock

Ignorance is Bliss
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Francis Diatschenko
Harmony 1 : Lou Bennett
Harmony 2 : Sally Dastey
Harmony 3 : Amy Saunders

Trust Us
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
L. Guitar : Francis Diatschenko
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jessies Lloyd
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

Tree
Piano : Stephen Maxwell

Ngadijina
Harmony : Deline Briscoe
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock
Verbatim : Deline Briscoe

Sweet Frangipani
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
L. Guitar : Colin Badger
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

All Things Broken
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Trumpet : Paul Coyle

In The Night
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Vocal : Jade’Amali Leuga

Need Your Love
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Percuss. : Neda Rahmani
L.Guitar : Colin Badger
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

 

 

Media release: Adam Simmons + Afro Lankan Drumming System in world premiere of The Calling

REVIEWS

Adam Simmons: The Calling
—★★★★ Jessica Nicholas, The Age & Sydney Morning Herald
“… a deep philosophical – even existential – exploration of Simmons’ own identity and sense of belonging… the most personal of all the works he has produced for his Usefulness of Art series.”
“The most impactful – and poignant – passage arose when Simmons and Iyengar performed a semi-improvised duet. Standing behind Simmons, the dancer extended his hands gently around the saxophonist’s hips, allowing him to lean forward at a sharp angle as streams of sonorous beauty emerged from his soprano horn. It was arresting both musically and visually, reflecting the sense of empathy and shared experience that gives this work such a strong emotional resonance.”

Adam Simmons: The Calling
—★★★★★ Raphael Solarsh, Arts Hub
“A lush and cinematic appeal to euphoria and melancholia of outer exploration, The Calling takes a more introspective turn, but does so with an unexpected fire and force… (a) sonic freefall into a raw and emotive tour de force.”
“Another masterpiece by Simmons and his collaborators, and further fires the imagination as to how this concert series will conclude. At home perhaps or onward on the journey?”

Adam Simmons: The Calling
—★★★★+half Des Cowley, Australian Books and Arts Review
“In an age when the funding of the arts is always an open question, Simmons’s project is a rallying cry for the importance of art in our lives.”
“In a world rife with displacement, it (The Calling) questions where we truly belong, and argues for art as an integral means of bringing us together.”
“As with previous concerts in the series, Adam Simmons demonstrated jazz’s capacity to continually extend its horizons, drawing sustenance from an array of musical influences: world, classical, experimental. In looking for a parallel – and while acknowledging that the music is of an entirely different order – I was reminded of Duke Ellington’s masterpiece The Far East Suite, composed with Billy Strayhorn and inspired by their travels on tour through Mumbai, Calcutta, Colombo, Lahore, Tehran, Isfahan, and other locales in the early 1960s. Like Ellington, Simmons has chosen to recast his stories and journeys as an extended musical suite. On this occasion, the melding of the Afrolankan Drumming System with the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble was an astounding success. The performance, heightened by strong visual and theatrical elements, again evidenced Simmons’s far-reaching ambition for The Usefulness of Art program.

Adam Simmons and Vikram Iyengar in The Calling
Roger Mitchell, Ausjazz.net
“The strongest image, for me, was that of Simmons supported wholly by Iyengar, symbolising his finding of a connection.”
“It is impossible, and unnecessary, to compare The Calling with other concerts in The Usefulness of Art series. But this work of art well and truly passed the test of taking us somewhere, of prompting exploration.”


Acclaimed Melbourne composer, Adam Simmons, will perform the world premiere of his new work, The Calling, at fortyfive downstairs from May 3—6, 2018.
Featuring the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble together with the Afro Lankan Drumming System (Ray Pereira and Kanchana Karunaratna), The Calling concerts promise to be a thrilling treat for lovers of contemporary jazz, classical, avant garde and experimental music.
Inspired by sounds and experiences from Simmons’ first-time visit to Sri Lanka in 2016, this will be the most intensely personal of his works to date. While the main reason for his trip was to attend a drumming workshop led by Ray Pereira, he also spent time travelling through his mother’s homeland. An epiphany he experienced while visiting a Sri Lankan temple was a pivotal moment in his sense of belonging and understanding: “I felt like after growing up in Australia and my previous travels through Europe that it filled in the other half of who I am, where I’m from, and my identity as an Australian artist. I’ve never really expressed the Sri Lankan side of my heritage; until that trip I hadn’t felt the connection or the right to express it in a conscious way. But now I feel I can make some sense of it, and The Calling is really a reflection on my identity and heritage.”
The Calling will be the fourth in his acclaimed The Usefulness of Art concert series. Comprising five unique and original concerts over 2017-18, The Usefulness of Art is inspired by a Rodin quote, and is the driving force behind Simmons’ formidable musical career.
His first three concerts in the series have elicited rapturous praise from critics and audiences alike, including The Age’s Jessica Nicholas: “… another marvellously assured step in Simmons’ own journey as musician and composer, and a potent demonstration of the usefulness – no, the necessity – of art as an expression of our collective humanity.”
A 5-star review by Raphael Solarsh of Arts Hub effused: “Simmons’ music is rich and evocative with the cinematic string arrangement given a grittier and more tactile edge by saxophony that spanned subtle breath all the way to unrestrained wail.”
Classical Reviewer Clive O’Connell wrote, “At a time when really adventurous musical events are rare, this night was a breath of fresh air, leaving you elated with its accomplishment,” and Des Cowley, Australian Book Review, described the second concert as, “… a triumph in every way”.

A virtuoso player of saxophones, clarinets, flute and shakuhachi (Japanese flute), Simmons stretches the boundaries of modern composition and infuses a sense of wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. His performances are not so much ‘concerts’ as staged auditory spectacles—drawing audiences in to share in the uniquely communal power and euphoria of his music and art. He has a rare and uncanny ability to elicit the very best from the highly accomplished musicians he works with, as well as evoking spine-tingling emotion and rapturous applause from audiences.

His concerts are joyous, inspired cross-genre collaborations with virtuoso musicians and theatrical artists. Previous concerts have involved not only his eclectic Creative Music Ensemble (in which his father, Paul Simmons, plays saxophone) but also artists of the calibre of Michael Kieran Harvey, the Arcko Ensemble, and Diokno Pasilan.
For The Calling, the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble and the Afro Lankan Drumming System will be joined by Vikram Iyengar (choreographer), Jean Poole (visuals), Sally Blackwood (dramaturgy) and Christine Crawshaw (costumes) for an astounding theatrical and musical experience.

This project is supported by the City of Melbourne Arts Grants Program.


THE CALLING (by Adam Simmons)
Featuring: The Adam Simmons Creative Ensemble + The Afro Lankan Drumming System
With: Choreography by Vikram Iyengar, visuals Jean Poole, dramaturgy Sally Blackwood and costumes Christine Crawshaw
Dates: Thursday 3rd May to Sunday 6th May, 7.30pm each night except Sunday matinee at 3pm. Concert duration: 90 minutes.
Venue: fortyfivedownstairs, 45 Flinders Lane, Melbourne 3000
Ticket prices: Full $35, concession $30, Early Bird discount $30, children (under 12) free
Ticketing URL: http://www.fortyfivedownstairs.com/wp2016/event/the-calling/
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Previous concerts in The Usefulness of Art concert series:
Concert #3: Travelling Tales (Adam Simmons with Arcko Ensemble)
Concert #2: Meditation on The Usefulness of Art is music for our times (The Usefulness of Art)
Concert #1: Unique concert series to explore The Usefulness of Art (Concerto for Piano & Toy Band)
Adam Simmons

Media release: Adam Simmons and Arcko ensemble in Melbourne premiere of Travelling Tales

REVIEWS

Adam Simmons review: Potent demonstration of the necessity of art
—4 stars, Jessica Nicholas, The Age
“Travelling Tales is another marvellously assured step in Simmons’ own journey as musician and composer, and a potent demonstration of the usefulness – no, the necessity – of art as an expression of our collective humanity.”

Travelling Tales
—5 stars, Raphael Solarsh, Arts Hub
“An exquisite musical journey that takes you from sun down amongst natural beauty to first light after a sleepless city night. Simmons’ music is rich and evocative with the cinematic string arrangement given a grittier and more tactile edge by saxophony that spanned subtle breath all the way to unrestrained wail.”

Travelling Tales (fortyfivedownstairs)
—4 stars, Des Cowley, Australian Books and Arts Review
“With three projects in the series now completed, Adam Simmons’s ‘The Usefulness of Art’ can increasingly be viewed as a major musical statement by a mid-career artist. The radical decision by a musician most often associated with jazz to conceptualise these large-scale performances – each in collaboration with a different ensemble – as artworks rather than club gigs is testament to the broad-ranging ambitiousness of Simmons as a composer. For Travelling Tales, the Arcko Symphonic Ensemble provided admirable support, performing their task with extraordinary precision, an impressive feat given that it followed just two rehearsals.”

Useful = accessible
—Clive O’Connell, classical music reviewer
“And the concert fulfilled the aim of Simmons’ intent: to illustrate the usefulness of his art – both to himself and to us.  I think that the basis of what he is attempting is to found his music in comprehensibility – no, instant understanding.  Music that is accessible, intellectually and emotionally, is useful; composers who choose to obfuscate, inadvertently or intentionally, are heading in the other direction and writing music of no help to anyone.
“More down-to-earth, the composer has succeeded in linking his own swooping performance creativity and the pervasive power of his playing with a formal framework of such character that should reassure even the most conservative listener.”

Adam Simmons’ Travelling Tales music review (45 Downstairs, Melbourne)
—Shane Murphy, Daily Review
“Simmons is relaxed and warm in his introductions; it’s clear he’s someone who loves what he does. This is not the art of torturous self-analysis, but for this instalment at least, reflections on travel and the experiences encountered… a smooth night of sweet music.”

What Melbourne Loved in 2017, part 3 —Favourite moments
—Sarah Walker, Sometimes Melbourne
“My other favourite moment was during The Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble’s The Usefulness of Art concert at fortyfivedownstairs. The whole concert was so suffused with joy and excitement. At the crescendo of the work, Adam was standing in front of the orchestra, furiously conducting, not so much leading the music as wrenching it from the performers – punching the air to bring the sound along with him and as the piece peaked, he let out this yell that was the most cathartic release of energy, and the band crashed around him, and, holy shit, I had goosebumps coursing up and down my whole body and everything was shining.”

2017 Arts Highlights of the Year
—Des Cowley, Australian Books and Arts Review
There were many memorable performances by jazz and improvising musicians throughout 2017. Two that stood out incorporated strong visual and theatrical elements.
Composer and multi-instrumentalist Adam Simmons’s The Usefulness of Art (ABR Arts, 8/17), performed by a large ensemble at fortyfivedownstairs, similarly incorporated theatrical costume and design to heighten the power of this impassioned music.


Hotter-than-hot musical wunderkind Adam Simmons brings the Melbourne premiere of his musical suite Travelling Tales to fortyfivedownstairs from December 7—10.
Simmons will perform this rapturous avant garde-jazz-classical suite with the 20-piece world-class Arcko Ensemble, conducted by Timothy Phillips.
Simmons composed and first performed Travelling Tales for the 2013 Piraeus Festival in Athens, Greece, with the Intrarti Orchestra. The work comprises musical vignettes inspired by his worldwide travels, love of Japanese shakuhachi music, and profound belief in the usefulness of art.
It will be the third in his acclaimed The Usefulness of Art concert series. Comprising five concerts over two years, The Usefulness of Art series is inspired by a Rodin quote, and is the driving force behind Simmons’ formidable musical career.
The first two concerts have elicited rapturous praise from critics and audiences alike. The Age Classical Reviewer, Clive O’Connell, wrote, “At a time when really adventurous musical events are rare, this night was a breath of fresh air, leaving you elated with its accomplishment.”
Des Cowley, Australian Book Review, described the second concert as, “… a triumph in every way,” and the Daily Review’s Shane Murphy said, “If the usefulness of art is to make one happy, then Simmons went a long way to doing so.”
A virtuoso player of saxophones, clarinets, flute and shakuhachi (Japanese flute), Simmons stretches the boundaries of modern composition and infuses a sense of wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas.
His performances are not so much ‘concerts’ as staged auditory spectacles—drawing audiences in to share in the uniquely communal power and euphoria of his music and art.
Revered by his peers, lauded by critics and adored by audiences, up to now he’s been somewhat of an unsung hero on the Melbourne music scene. This is all about to change; as well as co-directing a killer line-up at the latest Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues, he’s just got a gig as artist-in-residence for FOMA MONA 2018 and won a spot in the Australia Council’s prestigious Arts Leaders Program.
For Travelling Tales, Simmons chose to work with Timothy Phillips and the Arcko Ensemble not just because of their virtuoso playing but also their focus on Australian works and composers. With a 20-piece string orchestra and conductor, Simmons will be playing tenor and soprano saxophones as well as bass clarinet. Continuing the theatrically-inspired theme for his concerts, the musicians will be wearing costumes designed by Christine Crawford.

An award-winning and world-renowned musician, Adam Simmons redefines the term ‘multi-instrumentalist’, stretches the boundaries of modern composition, and infuses a sense of childlike wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. He has a deserved reputation as one of Australia’s most prolific and eclectic musical artists, appearing on festival stages and recordings with some of the world’s finest classical and jazz musicians, and is renowned for his inclusive, collaborative and uplifting performances.

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Concert #2: Meditation on The Usefulness of Art is music for our times (The Usefulness of Art)
Concert #1: Unique concert series to explore The Usefulness of Art (Concerto for Piano & Toy Band)