Media release: Deline Briscoe, Yalanji Woman of Song launches solo debut CD, Wawu

After 10 years touring the world as a principal artist with the Black Arm Band and performing with Archie Roach, Dr G Yunupingu and Jessie Lloyd’s Mission Songs Project, Yalanji woman of song Deline Briscoe has launched her stunning solo debut album, Wawu.
Wawu—a Yalanji word encompassing the concepts of spirit, heart, love and connections between people, land, past, present and future—tells the story of four generations of women from one family: Deline, her daughter Jade, her Mother and her Mother’s mother.
Sung in Yalanji language as well as English, the songs extend a gentle call to people struggling in life; an acknowledgement of their pain, and a tender reassurance that can only come from women who have risen, triumphant, from the darkest of times.
While the songs speak of the older women’s journeys through the trauma of separation from their families and of her own experience with abusive relationships, the mood of the album is compassionate and redemptive. In both subject and style, the album’s acoustic soul/hip-hop/jazz fusions draws parallels with Lauryn Hill’s groundbreaking The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.
Deline’s extraordinary, soulful and jazz-infused vocals are enriched by all-acoustic instruments brilliantly played by Airileke Ingram (drums), Robbie Finch (double bass), Stephen Maxwell (piano), Paul Coyle (trumpet) and Phil Bywater (clarinet/saxophone) as the core band.
Special guests include ARIA award-winning jazz pianist/composer Andrea Keller, with whom Deline co-wrote the exquisite Sonrise. Ignorance Is Bliss, written by Tiddas (Lou Bennett, Amy Saunders and Sally Dastey), is given a contemporary re-working and features the reunited Tiddas on harmony vocals. Deline’s 12-year-old daughter, Jade’Amali Leuga, lends her assured spoken-word vocals to In The Night. Sister songstresses from the Mission Songs Project, Jessie Lloyd, Jess Hitchcock and Emma Donovan, harmonise throughout.
In Ngadijina, a spoken-word piece, Deline recites her Nanna’s memories of witnessing her family being taken by police in the era of the first stolen generation (quoted verbatim from her Nanna’s interview for the Bringing Them Home report), while the ethereal Tree (co-written by Deline and Bart Willoughby, based on a poem and lyrics by Kevin Gilbert), is a hymn to creation and nature.
Wawu is the realisation of Deline’s creative vision, nurtured over the last 20 years. The launch concerts promise to capture the imaginations, hearts and ears of audiences—her album and show will be a spiritual experience as much as a musical journey.


INTERVIEWS
Saturday 30 June 2018—ABC Radio National, Awaye with Daniel Browning
Sunday 8 July 2018—ABC Radio National, The Music Show with Andrew Ford


DELINE BRISCOE—BIO
Deline Briscoe is an internationally acclaimed singer songwriter hailing from the Kuku Yalanji of far northern Australia. Her soulful intimate sound has defined her as one of Australia’s finest voices. A principal artist in Australia’s leading performing arts company Black Arm Band, Deline has performed to over one million people worldwide, alongside artists such as Archie Roach, Dr G Yunupingu, Tiddas, Emma Donovan, and Jessie Lloyd’s Mission Songs Project.
Showcasing her strong Indigenous heritage with songs in her mother tongue Gugu Yalanji of North Queensland, Deline’s progressive journey as a Yalanji songwoman upholds cultural song traditions through her language connection. As a mother, Deline also has an understanding of the beauty and pain of our human experience, her songs bring messages of love, hope and empowerment for women. With humble beginnings in the trio act Briscoe Sisters, Deline developed exceptional abilities in musical arrangements and compositions. Her unique sound is described as ‘Rainforest Soul’; acoustic roots with harmonies interweaving vocal lines that seamlessly move between traditional and modern songlines.
Deline Briscoe EPK


WAWU—CD DETAILS

Deline Briscoe solo debut CD, Wawu
Release date: July 2018
Name of album : Wawu
Artist : Deline Briscoe
Genre/s : Roots/Jazz/Acoustic Soul/Acoustic Hip hop/ Folk
Produced by : Deline Briscoe and Airileke
Engineered & mixed by : Colin Leadbetter, Sing Sing
Mastered by : Matthew Cunliffe
Australian distribution : MGM Online Distribution (digital)
https://www.delinebriscoe.com and live shows (hard copies)
Label : Independent
Publisher : Gaba Musik
CD Design : Lyn Geia
Photography : Peggy Kasabad
Weaving : Delissa Walker

Track list and song I.D.
01  Wawu  : 1:29 AUGGB1870001
02  Heartbeat   : 3:53 AUGGB1870002
03  Human Experience : 4:57 AUGGB1870003
04  Sonrise : 4:57 AUGGB1870004
05  Joe : 5:16 AUGGB1870005
06 Ignorance Is Bliss : 4:20 AUGGB1870006
07  Trust Us : 2:48 AUGGB1870007
08  Tree : 3:42 AUGGB1870008
09  Ngadijina : 1:07 AUGGB1870009
10  Sweet Frangipani : 5:04 AUGGB1870010
11  All Things Broken : 5:17 AUGGB1870011
12  In The Night : 2:46 AUGGB1870012
13  Need Your Love : 4:35 AUGGB1870013

Musicians (core band):
Airileke Ingram – Drums, Robbie Finch – Double Bass, Stephen Maxwell – Piano, Paul Coyle – trumpet, Phil Bywater – Clarinet/Saxophone

Guests artists include:
Andrea Keller (piano/composer); Tiddas (composers/harmony vocals); Emma Donovan, Jessie Lloyd and Jess Hitchcock (harmony vocals)

Musicians:

Wawu
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch

Heartbeat
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Harmony : Lou Bennett
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jessie Lloyd

Human Experience
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Clarinet : Phil Bywater
Trumpet : Paul Coyle
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock
Copyright : Deline Briscoe

Sonrise
Piano : Andrea Keller
Copyright : Briscoe/Keller

Joe
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Harmony : Jessie Lloyd
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jesica Hitchcock

Ignorance is Bliss
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Francis Diatschenko
Harmony 1 : Lou Bennett
Harmony 2 : Sally Dastey
Harmony 3 : Amy Saunders

Trust Us
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
L. Guitar : Francis Diatschenko
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Emma Donovan
Harmony : Jessies Lloyd
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

Tree
Piano : Stephen Maxwell

Ngadijina
Harmony : Deline Briscoe
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock
Verbatim : Deline Briscoe

Sweet Frangipani
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
L. Guitar : Colin Badger
Percussion : Airileke Ingram
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

All Things Broken
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Bass : Robert Finch
Drums : Airileke Ingram
Trumpet : Paul Coyle

In The Night
Piano : Stephen Maxwell
Vocal : Jade’Amali Leuga

Need Your Love
Bass : Robert Finch
Guitar : Deline Briscoe
Percuss. : Neda Rahmani
L.Guitar : Colin Badger
Harmony : Jessica Hitchcock

 

 

Media campaign: Meditation on “The Usefulness of Art” is music for our times

Acclaimed Melbourne jazz composer and musician Adam Simmons returns to fortyfivedownstairs for four nights in August, with a rare opportunity to experience his The Usefulness of Art suite performed by a world-class 20-piece ensemble.
The concerts will be the first time The Usefulness of Art has been performed by the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble alongside an art installation by Filipino sculptor Diokno Pasilan and featuring costumes by Christine Crawshaw.
While The Usefulness of Art suite—with its sublime meditations on the qualities of acceptance, empathy, generosity, compassion and faith—is already known to fans of Simmons’ avant-garde trio, Origami, it has only once before been performed live by a larger ensemble, during its creative development process.
Expanding the work for the much larger ensemble builds on its contemplative nature and elevates it to an immersive and ecstatic listening experience through the musicians’ connection with audiences—something that drives Simmons’ approach to performance. Earlier this year Joseph Earp of Beat magazine wrote that “… for Simmons, art has a uniquely communal power. His pieces, though obscure, are never difficult, and his performances are always guided by the goal of audience unity.”
This will be the second of Simmons’ planned five-concert series throughout 2017-18 under the umbrella of The Usefulness of Art, a concept inspired by Auguste Rodin’s quote—“I call useful all that gives us happiness… art shows man his raison d’être.”
Says Simmons, “I strongly believe art is what helps us connect. In these times, 100 years or so since Rodin made similar observations, I believe this is what we need more of, and these performances are a result of coming to share Rodin’s perspective.”
He composed The Usefulness of Art in 2012, at a time when arts funding in Australia was being savaged across the board—in schools, TAFEs, universities and the public and private sectors—and public debate was characterised by a lack of empathy. His musical meditations on the unquantifiable qualities that art evokes make for powerful listening, and an experience that is more compelling and relevant than ever to audiences.
Musicians for this concert include Simmons on bass clarinet and leading the ensemble; on saxophones, Samuel Boon, Cara Taber, Gideon Brazil and Paul Simmons; trumpets, Gemma Horbury and Gavin Cornish; and trombones James Wilkinson and Bryn Hills. The redoubtable Howard Cairns—also a member of Origami—will play double bass, alongside Miranda Hill. On drums will be Niko Schauble and Hugh Harvey, and percussion Nat Grant, Carmen Chan, Leah Scholes and Diokno Pasilan. David Brown will play guitar, and Pete Lawler (Weddings, Parties, Anything), space drums.
The first in The Usefulness of Art series, in March 2017, was Simmons’ remarkable Concerto for Piano and Toy Band featuring Michael Kieran Harvey. These concerts elicited rapturous praise from critics and audiences alike, including from The Age Classical Reviewer, Clive O’Connell, who wrote, “At a time when really adventurous musical events are rare, this night was a breath of fresh air, leaving you elated with its accomplishment.”
Ian Parsons, The Sound Barrier, PBS 106.7FM, wrote: “Aside from his phenomenal talent, Adam is driven by three things: his unwavering belief in the vitalness of the arts for who we are as human beings; his indefatigable curiosity for exploring new things; and his passionate commitment to music as a means for bringing people together and building community… what Adam’s music does is gently but powerfully force everyone to think outside their own comfort zones and to find the new spaces that emerge when, as Adam describes it, opposite sides of the same coin are shared.”
An award-winning and world-renowned musician, Simmons redefines the term ‘multi-instrumentalist’, stretches the boundaries of modern composition, and infuses a sense of childlike wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas. He has a deserved reputation as one of Australia’s most prolific and eclectic musical artists, appearing on festival stages and recordings with some of the world’s finest classical and jazz musicians, and is renowned for his inclusive and collaborative performances.
He was recently named as a co-artistic director for the 2017 Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and Blues, and has just returned from major jazz festivals in Germany and the Netherlands, where he helped facilitate exciting new performance and networking opportunities for Australian musicians.
The Usefulness of Art concerts across 2017-18 will be recorded live, for release digitally and as a box set of CDs.
This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body. This project is supported by the Victorian Government through Creative Victoria.

TUoA concert 2 banner

REVIEWS

A Window On Our Raison D’Etre
—Roger Mitchell, Ausjazz.net
“With any offering inspired by Adam Simmons there is going to be more than merely music… this concert invited the audience to become deeply immersed in the work of creativity and, ultimately, to join in a shared experience.
“That unity and sense of community is what has lingered in my mind so long after this second concert in a series of five that will stretch into 2018. The sense of fun and joy was still evident among the ensemble members, although the set and costumes conveyed a darker mood. As collective voices joined Pete Lawler’s distinctive and arresting solo vocals at the culmination of this concert, drawing the audience into their harmonic spell, I felt that we were indeed united and there was much power and benefit in that.”

The Usefulness of Art (fortyfivedownstairs)
—Des Cowley, Australian Book Review—4.5 stars
“This performance was a triumph in every way. While the approach drew upon the pioneering work of Anthony Braxton’s Creative Music Orchestra, the resulting music – with titles such as ‘Empathy’, Compassion’, ‘Faith’ – evoked the spiritual music of John Coltrane, in particular his masterpiece A Love Supreme (1964). Like Coltrane’s work, this was music at the service of the human spirit. Adam Simmons has stated that the genesis of the suite derived, in part, from his reading of Auguste Rodin’s views on the usefulness of artists. At a time when funding support for art and artists is diminishing, The Usefulness of Art attempts to put forth an alternative scenario. If the composition asks the question of whether art plays a critical role in our culture, our personal lives, these musicians and this performance responded with a resounding affirmation.”

The Usefulness of Art
—Shane Murphy, Daily Review
“The beauty of Adam Simmons’ work is that it respects this (… that this sort of jazz is conscious art and deserves active listening)… (it) aims to draw its listeners in and rewards you for that participation. Simmons’ circular breathing and overblowing in the introduction was especially inspiring. Sounding like a cross between clarinet and didgeridoo, it set the tone for what was to come…a solid hour of music played with verve and passion, capped with a singalong to close. If the usefulness of art is to make one happy, then Simmons went a long way to doing so…”

Adam Simmons: The Usefulness of Art
—David Collins, Australian Arts Review
The Usefulness of Art starts with a whisper from Adam’s bass clarinet… indeed, this whisper sparks, surging into something monstrous and beautiful. The musicians took it in turns to lead through this lovely piece of auditory spectacle.”

SELECTION OF ONLINE ARTICLES


Adam Simmons—100 word bio

Adam Simmons redefines the term ‘multi-instrumentalist’, stretching the boundaries of modern composition and infusing a sense of childlike wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas.
An award-winning and world-renowned musician, he has a reputation as one of Australia’s most prolific and eclectic musical artists, appearing on festival stages and recordings with some of the world’s finest classical and jazz musicians.
He was recently named co-artistic director for the 2017 Wangaratta Jazz and Blues Festival and participated in major European jazz festivals, where he helped facilitate new performance opportunities for Australian musicians.

Media campaign: Jessie Lloyd’s Mission Songs Project

The Songs Back Home is a collection of Australian Indigenous folk songs performed from 1900-1999 on Christian missions, settlements and native camps where Indigenous people were relocated. As part of her Mission Songs Project, Jessie Lloyd has spent the past two years faithfully exploring the journey of Indigenous Australian music, connecting traditional with contemporary, and charting continuing cultural practice and oral traditions well into the 21st century. The songs, largely hidden from the outside world, comprise rare and almost-forgotten stories, shedding light onto the history and experiences of Indigenous people, their families and communities. Jessie launched The Songs Back Home, the first of the Mission Songs Project collection, in March 2017 at the Brunswick Music Festival and is touring the album throughout the east coast of Australia.

“The 20th Century songs composed and sung on Aboriginal missions and settlements are records of our history and history and tell us about the emotions and aspirations of their composers. Jessie Lloyd’s research to find these songs is a profoundly important contribution to our nation and music.”—Professor Marcia Langton, AM, Mission Songs Project advisor and contributor

“Mission Songs Project presents contemporary folk songs that continue the ancient song lines of this country. The songs speak of the daily lives of the First Peoples who were relocated from their traditional homelands to the missions.”—Archie Roach, AM, Mission Songs Project advisor and contributor

The Songs Back Home CD reviews:

“…a significant release both as a cultural artifact but also for its pure enjoyment factor… full of love and life and hope, sung with great emotion at a level rare in many contemporary albums… As a listener you feel part of the circle and included in the experience. The songs take you through a range of emotions—sadness but also overwhelming joy, compassion, love and many others.”—Steve Britt, Rhythms magazine, May/June 2017

“… a great addition to recordings of genuine Australian folk music… a triumph for Jessie Lloyd.”—Tony Smith, Trad & Now magazine, May 2017

“Islander rhythms, campfire country and defiant humour celebrate simple joys. Melancholy ballads chart a journey of blood, sweat and tears… you’ll almost hear the kettle boil as a closing home recording of the elders invites us to sit down with these unsung survivors.”—4.5 stars, Chris Lambie, Fairfax (The Age, Sydney Morning Herald, Brisbane Times) (read the full review)

“This album defies categorisation in an exciting and innovative way. This contrasting material, with its mix of optimism, happiness, humour alongside sorrow and hardship, characterises the main artist Jessie Lloyd’s wish to promote conciliation through music.”—Ethnomusicologist, Dr Muriel E. Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Loud Mouth (The Music Trust) (read the full review)

“…profoundly moving… the entire collection is sublime.”—4.5 stars, Stephen Fitzpatrick, The Australian (read the full review)

Mission Songs Project, Jessie Lloyd media interviews:

Reviews of the live Mission Songs Project show:

National Folk Festival, April 2017 Rhythms magazine: “Stand-out artists of the Festival included National Folk Fellow Jessie Lloyd for her Mission Songs Project who, with a line-up of top Indigenous artists, presented a rare collection of early Australian Indigenous contemporary songs that were performed on missions and settlements. All Jessie’s shows were packed out.
https://rhythms.com.au/2017-folk-festival-glowing-success/

Port Fairy Folk Festival, March 2017 Chris Lambie, Rhythms magazine: “Daughter of Joe Geia, Jessie Lloyd, travelled the nation to talk with elders for The Mission Songs Project. ‘The Songs Back Home’ is a collection of Indigenous folk songs performed on Christian missions, settlements and native camps from 1900-1999. Not a moment too soon, Lloyd has revived these unique songlines before they’re lost forever. The warm and articulate performer shared the lead on family yarns and glorious harmonies with Emma Donovan, Deline Briscoe and Jessica Hitchcock.”
https://rhythms.com.au/port-fairy-folk-festival-2017-thats-wrap/

Blue Mountains Music Festival, March 2017 Elizabeth Walton, Timber & Steel: “The Mission Songs Project brings new life to the voices of the stolen generation and indigenous Australians who were splintered from their cultures when they were made to sing in a foreign language. Today, traditional languages are so far removed from their vernacular that singing in English has become the mainstay, the local languages have become the foreign tongue. Yet everything has its resurgence if you can claim it before it achieves vanishing point. The stories are heartfelt and beautifully sung – perhaps not with the campfire instruments of their natural settings, but the end result is one that adapts well to the contemporary stage and travels to a diverse and broad audience – for The Mission Songs Project, this is mission accomplished, and accomplished incredibly well.”
https://timberandsteel.wordpress.com/2017/03/21/2017-blue-mountains-music-festival-the-wrap/

msp_cd_cover_media_low_res

The Songs Back Home album information
Artist: 
       Mission Songs Project / Jessie Lloyd
CD title:    The Songs Back Home
Synopsis:  10 songs selected from a collection of Australian Indigenous songs from 1900 to 1999, focusing on the Christian missions, state-run settlements and native camps where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were relocated. Curated, arranged and produced by Jessie Lloyd.

Album Credits:
Produced by Jessie Lloyd
Recorded at The Aviary Recording Studio, Melbourne
Engineered, mixed and mastered by Colin Leadbetter
Artwork by Joe Geia and Creative Design by Lyn Geia
Project Patrons and Advisors – Prof Marcia Langton AM and Archie Roach AM

Singers and Musicians:
Jessie Lloyd – vocals/ukulele/acoustic guitar
Monica Weightman – vocals/acoustic guitar
Leah Flanagan – vocals
Karrina Nolan – vocals
Jess Hitchcock – vocals
Iain Grandage – piano/piano accordion
Ed Bates – pedal steel guitar
Rob Mahoney – double bass
Archie Roach – vocals/acoustic guitar (track 11)
Lillian Geia – vocals/ukulele (tracks 10 & 12)
Lynelda Tippo – vocals (tracks 10 & 12)
Alma Geia – vocals (track 13)

Track Order:
1.  Own Native Land  2:53
2.  Outcast Half-Caste  2:35
3.  The Irex  3:32
4.  Down in the Kitchen  2:03
5.  Hopkins River (feat. Monica Weightman)  3:25
6.  Old Cape Barren (feat. Jessica Hitchcock)  3:25
7.  Middle Camp  3:00
8.  Surrare  2:20
9.  Port Fort Hill  2:49
10.   Now Is the Hour Medley (feat. Lou Bennett, Leah Flanagan & Mere-Rose Paul)  4:23

Bonus Tracks:
11.   Hopkins River – Archie Roach  2:14
12.   The Irex – Geia Sisters (Lillian Geia and Lynelda Tippo)  1:11
13.   Down In the Kitchen – Alma Geia  0:38

Dedicated to Alma Dawn Geia (1921 – 2016)

About the Mission Songs Project
Mission Songs Project is an initiative to revive contemporary Australian Indigenous songs from 1900 to 1999, focusing on the Christian missions, state run settlements and native camps where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were relocated.
Searching for the secular songs that were sung after church, Mission Songs Project looks to explore the day to day life of the mission days, from cultural identity to love and loss. These unique songs consist of almost forgotten stories that can now shed light into the history of our Indigenous elders, families and communities.
Mission Songs Project faithfully explores the musical journey of Indigenous Australian music as Jessie Lloyd connects the traditional with contemporary, revealing the continuation of cultural practice and song traditions into the 21st Century.
missionsongsproject.com

Mission Songs Project advisors and contributors:
Archie Roach
Marcia Langton
Peena, Cedric, Lillian, Delphine and Joe Geia
Lynelda Tippo
Frank Anderson
Paul Gorden
Jeremy Beckett
Karl Nuenfeldt
Chris Sullivan
Aaron Corn
Clint Bracknell
Elverina Johnson
Will Kepa
Seaman Dan
Cessa Mills
Roger Knox
Kath Mills
Stephen Pigram
Baamba Alberts
Rosie Smith
Jill Shelton
Emma Donovan
Deline Briscoe
John Wayne Parsons
Luana Pitt
Tiriki Onus
Monica Weightman
Robert Champion
William Barton
Marlene Cummins
Warren Roberts
Johnny Nicol
Mindalaya Read
Eugenia Flynn
Leah Flanagan
Karrina Nolan
David Williams
Jessica Hitchcock
Vonda Last
Eddie Peters
Maxine Briggs

Mission Songs Project Sponsors and Supporting Programs:
State Library of Victoria – Creative Fellowship 2016
National Library of Australia – Folk Fellowship 2017
South Australian Museum – Tindale Collection, AA346 Board for Anthropological Research Collection
Archie Roach Foundation
Australia Council for the Arts
Creative Victoria
Australian Performing Rights Association

Jessie Lloyd Bio:
Originally from the tropics of North Queensland, Jessie Lloyd is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander musician who performs a broad collection of Australian Indigenous songs. A vocalist, guitarist, bassist and ukulele player, Jessie earned her formal qualifications at Abmusic in Perth, WA in 2002.
An award winning composer, performer and creative entrepreneur, Jessie is a cultural practitioner of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander music. Dedicated to the continuation of cultural traditions through the presentation of both contemporary and traditional Indigenous music.
Jessie has travelled Australia in search of hidden songs to present this rare Indigenous narrative. From the Bass Strait to the Torres Strait and across the Arafura Sea, Jessie has spent time with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander senior song men and women, uncovering precious stories and songs from the mission days.
http://www.jessielloyd.com

Song synopsis:
1. OWN NATIVE LAND                Composed by Albert ‘Albie’ Edward Geia
This song was ­written by Albie Geia shortly after leading the 1957 strike on Palm Island with six other Indigenous men. The strike was against the discriminatory treatment of Indigenous people, after a petition to the superintendent demanding improved wages, health, housing and working conditions, was ignored. As punishment, Albie and his family were removed to Woorabinda, Qld.

2. OUTCAST HALF-CASTE            Composed by Micko Donovan and Mary Deroux
This song was written by Micko Donovan and Mary Deroux of northern New south Wales about growing up half-caste, a now ­derogatory term, used to describe Indigenous people of mixed heritage. The term was one of many devised in the ­policy to assimilate or ‘breed out’ ­Aborigines, and part of the ­misinformed theories of the ‘survival of the fittest’ that were deployed to result in Aboriginal extinction. Micko was raised on a mission and learned to play music from the local missionaries.

3. THE IREX                                Composer unknown
The Irex was the boat that transported Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who were forcibly removed from the mainland settlements governed by the Native Affairs officers or missionaries to Palm Island Aboriginal Settlement in Queensland. The Palm Island settlement was known as a ‘punishment island’ for those who committed misdemeanours on other government ­settlements or missions. A strike was organized by the Aboriginal ­residents in 1957 to protest the brutal conditions.

4. DOWN IN THE KITCHEN                        Composed by Alma Geia
This song is from the children’s dormitories on Palm Island, Queensland. It was composed by one of the residents, Alma Geia, in the 1920s. This innocent tune gives some insight into the living conditions of children who were removed from their families and placed in the segregated dormitories and how they made light of tough times.

5. HOPKINS RIVER                            Composed by Alice Clarke
A song brought to the project by senior songman Archie Roach.  This song comes from Framlingham mission in southwest Victoria, which was founded near the Hopkins River. It was from here that Archie was forcibly removed from his family which inspired him to write his classic song “Took the Children Away”. Hopkins River was written by Archie’s grandmother’s sister, Alice Clarke.

6. OLD CAPE BARREN                        Composer unknown
The Tasmanian ­Aboriginal community have a long history with Cape Barren Island but the last 200 years has been the most brutal act of ­genocide and ­oppression. The islanders have always maintained a strong ­presence and ­connection to Cape Barren, including cultural practices such as ­mutton birding. This beautiful song paints a picture into the old days, full of love and loss. It is an honour to have our Tasmanian brothers and sisters represented in Mission Songs Project.

7. MIDDLE CAMP                            Composed by Eric Craigie
Middle Camp was an Aboriginal camp set up on the fringes of the township of Moree in New South Wales. It was one of three camps and was closed down at some point by the local shire. 
Composed by Eric Craigie, this song is a protest ballad about displacement from his home when Middle Camp was closed. The lyrics and tune are full of optimism, resilience and determination, and love of the old community of the camp.

8. SURRARE                                Composer Unknown
A song from the Torres Straits, Surrare is a song about hunting a seabird that is sung in Ailan Kriol language. The Western Island language name for seagull is ‘Saora Leh’ and pronunciation has changed over time in various places. The final verse is Cowral Mut, a ‘curry feathered small bird’ and it sings of hunting inland as opposed to hunting coastal. This track incorporates all three versions although excluding the Western Island language words in the 3rd verse. The song was made popular by Joe Geia on his first solo album Yil Lull.

9. PORT FORT HILL                            Composer Unknown
A song from Darwin during the Second Word War, Fort Hill was a location where the Aboriginal and Torres strait Islander men used to scout for enemy ships and spies to keep the town safe. During the post-war years the Australian Half Caste Progress Association held weekly fund-raising dances at The Sunshine Club in a decommissioned Army barracks. This was one of the songs that was performed during those times.

10. NOW IS THE HOUR MEDLEY                    Traditional
This song, also known as the Maori Farewell, is a heartfelt tune adopted by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people on missions in the early 20th century. The Maori wives sang it to their husbands as they left to fight in WWI. It was then shared among the ANZACs including Aboriginal soldiers. The hymn Search Me Oh God was composed by a missionary from New Zealand using the same melody and is well know on many Aboriginal missions. Guest vocals are by Lou Bennett, Leah Flanagan and Mere-Rose Paul.

Media campaign: Unique concert series to explore “The Usefulness of Art”—Adam Simmons

Bubbles, rubber chickens, bursting balloons and toys aren’t usually associated with classical music or jazz concerts. But then again, Adam Simmons is not your usual modern composer and musician.
An award-winning and world-renowned musician, Simmons redefines the term ‘multi-instrumentalist’, stretches the boundaries of modern composition, and infuses a sense of childlike wonder and playfulness into musical art forms better known for their gravitas.
The elements of gentle whimsy woven throughout his music have become as much a trademark as his collaborations with other virtuoso players, his theatrically-inspired performances, and his endearing habit of wearing red socks without shoes on stage.
This year, in his most ambitious musical performance project to date, Simmons brings a series of concerts to fortyfivedownstairs under the umbrella of “The Usefulness of Art”—a notion inspired by a Rodin quote, and the driving force behind his formidable musical career.
The first of the concerts is his Concerto for Piano and Toy Band, to be performed by the Adam Simmons Creative Music Ensemble with l’enfant terrible of modern classical piano, Michael Kieran Harvey. In its Melbourne premiere, the one-hour concerto will be performed from Thursday 2nd to Sunday 5th March, offering music and arts lovers a rare opportunity to experience the power and delight of this extraordinary work.
Through the classical form of the concerto, Concerto for Piano and Toy Band juxtaposes traditional instruments (piano, saxophone, trumpets, trombone, double bass and drums) with toys, in a joyful exploration of connections between the different worlds of solo/ ensemble, classical/jazz, and serious/humorous.
Simmons has a deserved reputation as one of Australia’s most prolific and eclectic musical artists, appearing on festival stages and recordings with some of the world’s finest classical and jazz musicians. Michael Kieran Harvey is an internationally-recognised, classically-trained pianist. Together, these two good friends and self-described iconoclasts are champions of contemporary Australian composition, fierce defenders of the arts, and serious musicians who fuse original jazz, classical and avant garde music in a boisterous, passionate and joyous theatrical experience for audiences.
Concerto for Piano and Toy Band is the first in Simmons’ “The Usefulness of Art” concert series, presenting a creative body of work over five major performance projects throughout 2017—18. From his early VCA student days, Simmons’ music has been inspired by influential French sculptor Auguste Rodin’s quote: “As for me, I call useful anything that gives us happiness.”
Simmons believes that, “At a time when fear governs politics rather than vision and principles, at a time when we cannot offer our hand to those in need, at a time when support for music education is diminishing but studies show that music increases our empathy towards others and that it also has positive effects on the development of neural pathways, how can we not be encouraging more artistic experience and participation? This is the time when art is most useful!”.
“The Usefulness of Art” concerts will be recorded live, for intended release digitally and as a box set of CDs.
#TheUsefulnessofArt, #fortyfivedownstairs

Thank you to all the journalists, presenters and media outlets who are publishing and broadcasting Adam’s story! Here’s a selection…

Reviews

Music to make you happy: Adam Simmons and the Usefulness of Art on The Sound Barrier!
—Ian Parsons, The Sound Barrier, PBS 106.7FM
“Aside from his phenomenal talent, Adam is driven by three things: his unwavering belief in the vitalness of the arts for who we are as human beings; his indefatigable curiosity for exploring new things; and his passionate commitment to music as a means for bringing people together and building community… what Adam’s music does is gently but powerfully force everyone to think outside their own comfort zones and to find the new spaces that emerge when, as Adam describes it, opposite sides of the same coin are shared.”

It’s more than just child’s play for Adam Simmons
—Joseph Earp, Beat magazine
“Simmons doesn’t see the highbrow and the lowbrow as being at all separate, and he has equal regards for both, finding himself obsessed with both the intellectual and the basic. He is neither a toffy and exclusive classical composer, nor is he some flash-in-the-pan peddler of jokes: his subversive pieces lie somewhere in between those two extremes… for Simmons, art has a uniquely communal power. His pieces, though obscure, are never difficult, and his performances are always guided by the goal of audience unity. They might include a range of novelty items, but his compositions are stridently moving, and never seek to undermine the intelligence of the audience.”

Confucius Say, Give Musicians Liberty
—Roger Mitchell, ausjazz.net
“I loved this work. One of the performers, alto saxophonist Cara Taber, described this as ‘beautiful, thought-provoking, and strong original music by Adam Simmons’ and that fits… As is always the case with Simmons’ art, we are encouraged to enjoy as well as to reflect on what we are seeing and hearing, what the performers are bringing to us beyond their facility with a range of instruments.”

All This And Harvey Too
—Clive O’Connell, The Age Classical Reviewer & blogger
“At a time when really adventurous musical events are rare, this night was a breath of fresh air, leaving you elated with its accomplishment.”

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Review & media release: Red Dress and The Sugar Man—Marisa Quigley

Review of Butterfly Club show, Melbourne Fringe Festival 2016, by Diana Wolfe

You don’t have to know or like the music of Tom Waits (although you certainly will by the end of this show) or the extraordinary singing voice of Marisa Quigley (ditto) to be utterly seduced by this captivating beat-poetry-song-noir-cabaret show.

Everything about Red Dress & The Sugar Man interacts seamlessly to draw the audience under its spell. The venue (the elegantly wasted Butterfly Club) and its smoky lighting, the costumes, the performers, the songs, the intriguing and seductive narrative all begin to steal over you even before the 6’2” Titian-haired bombshell Quigley sashays onstage. She’s a latter-day and louche sort of Andrews Sister, a larger-than-life Jessica Rabbit with a voice like a fallen angel. The red velvet curtains part and she joins her backing band—all gangsterish older gents with rolled-up shirtsleeves, pork pie hats, world-weary attitudes and killer chops. Her two female backing singers are squeezed into tiny rock-and-roll dresses; they’re all breathy-voiced-coiffed-hair-staring-into-the-middle-distance-cool and sexy as all get-out. Kinda Jessica Lange in Blue Sky.

Quigley opens her scarlet-lipped mouth: first to begin the story of when Romeo met Rosie, then to sing the first of many carefully-chosen Tom Waits songs. And you’re gone.
She effortlessly affects an American accent, but far from grating or distracting, it only adds to the atmosphere. Her voice is deep, husky, measured, almost matter-of-fact. Playing a role reminiscent of Sam Elliot’s laconic LA cowboy narrator in The Big Lebowski, Quigley unfolds the chance meeting in a late-night coffee dive between the swaggering and dissolute Romeo and Rosie, a bad-girl-back-from-the-brink. Rosie’s clinging tenuously to her new, clean life, her St Christopher neck charm a sort of talisman to her redemption.
Quigley wrote the show (her debut script) and damn, this singer best known for her years of blues and folk performing, is a natural. Her script is playful, tantalising and pitch-perfect in terms of her wordplay, references to Waits’ lyrics, phrasing, delivery, and smooth segues into the next tune. The story of the doomed lovers is familiar and the ending, inevitable… but the journey is fascinating and heartbreaking nevertheless.
During Melbourne Fringe Festival 2016 it’s on at the suitably late hour of 10pm, down the end of seedy Carson Place off Little Collins Street. It’s only an hour long but Red Dress and the Sugar Man will leave you feeling like an extra on a 1940s detective film noir set to a Tom Waits soundtrack, witnessing the slow-motion death of a romance before it had a chance to live.
Media release for Adelaide Fringe Festival 2017—Prodigal daughter returns to Adelaide with tantalising cabaret show

Blues chanteuse Marisa Quigley returns to her Adelaide birthplace with her dark and sultry cabaret show, Red Dress & The Sugar Man.

Performing five shows from Wednesday 15th to Sunday 19th March as part of Adelaide Fringe, Red Dress & The Sugar Man is an original one-hour show that interweaves the music of Tom Waits with the modern-day story of a doomed love affair. The swaggering, dissolute Romeo and bad-girl-back-from-the-brink Rosie meet by chance at an all-night diner and fall prey to each other’s addictive allure, before drowning in a sea of regret.

You don’t have to know or like the music of Tom Waits or the extraordinary singing voice of Marisa Quigley to be utterly seduced by this captivating beat-poetry-music-noir-cabaret show. Everything about Red Dress & the Sugar Man interacts seamlessly to draw the audience under its spell. The performers, the songs and the seductive narrative all begin to steal over you even before the 6ft-tall Titian-haired bombshell Quigley sashays onstage.

With a cooking live band and lush harmonies, and set in Adelaide’s home of divine decadence, La Bohème, Red Dress & the Sugar Man will draw you in and leave you feeling like an extra on a 1940s detective film-noir, after witnessing the slow-motion death of a romance that never had a chance to live.

Marisa Quigley is an award-winning blues singer and songwriter, solo artist and cabaret performer. She lives in country Victoria, by way of Darwin and South Australia, and continues to travel to wherever her music takes her. She is a long-time Tom Waits obssessionado, and Red Dress & The Sugar Man marks her debut as a librettist. She has road-tested and refined the show to packed audiences and adoring fans throughout regional Victoria as well as the 2016 Melbourne Fringe Festival, and is thrilled to be back performing at the Adelaide Fringe Festival, which she last performed at in 2014.

Associate Professor David Mackenzie

Media campaign: The Costs of Youth Homelessness in Australia

With lead agency Margot Gorski PR Matters, I worked on the national launch of a world-first study into the costs of youth homelessness to the Australian economy.

The study by a leading homelessness researcher and two economists showed that preventing young people from becoming homeless by strengthening and integrating school and youth services at a community level could save an estimated $626 million per year across the youth justice and health services systems alone.

The report provides important evidence that early intervention works, and deserves investment to prevent future costs and the devastating social and personal impacts of youth homelessness.

Principal researchers: Associate Professor David Mackenzie (Swinburne), Professor Paul Flatau (The University of Western Australia) and Professor Adam Steen (Charles Sturt University).

Media reach—summary:

  • Estimated online views 213K
  • Social shares 1.67K
  • Press circulation 325K
  • Radio audience reach 1224K
Media coverage included:
  • ABC Radio 702 Sydney, 666 Canberra, 774 Melbourne, 891 Adelaide, 720 Perth, 612 Brisbane, 936 Hobart
  • ABC Radio and Online, The World Today with Rachael Brown (Listen: The price tag of youth homelessness)
  • ABC Radio National Drive with Patricia Karvelas
  • ABC Radio National Canberra with Kim Landers
  • ABC Radio Newcastle, Illawarra, Broken Hill, Mid North Coast, Central West NSW, Western Plains, Riverina, Far North
  • Radio Triple J Sydney
  • Radio 2GB Sydney
  • Radio 4BC Brisbane
  • Radio 2MCE Orange
  • Radio Adelaide
  • Herald Sun online
  • The Conversation
  • Australian Policy Online
  • The Canberra Times
  • Pro Bono Australia
  • Bendigo Advertiser
  • The Standard
  • The Ballarat Courier
  • SBS Online
  • The Border Mail
  • The West Australian (Op Ed)

Media information:

The Songs They Sang documentary and music soundtrack

Media campaign: The Songs They Sang

It was a great privilege to be part of bringing this extraordinary documentary film and music to Australian audiences. I was involved with publicising a series of screenings held at The Backlot Studios, Southbank, in June 2014.

Producers: Anna Monea and Armadeo Marquez-Perez.

The Songs They Sang: A musical narrative of the Vilna Ghetto

An Australian documentary that commemorates music and stories from the Vilna Ghetto in Lithuania during the Holocaust.
Directed by Rohan Spong, The Songs They Sang tells the true story of musical performances held inside the Jewish Ghetto at Vilna (now Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania) from 1941-1943. It explores the resilience of the people who created and performed the music in the face of systematic persecution and extermination by the Nazis.
The film centres around the stories of Shmerke Kaczerginski and Avrom Sutzkever, who steadfastly continued to compose poems and songs about their experiences of persecution, loss and grief, and organise public performances, despite their horrific circumstances. Their refusal to relinquish their culture brought hope to a people under siege, and offered them brief respite from fear and despair.
Filmed in Israel, France, Lithuania, America and Australia, the documentary features interviews with survivors of the Vilna Ghetto—including Melbourne-based Deborah Zuben—re-enactments of the musical performances by soprano Deborah Kayser and Vilna songs arranged by Joseph Giovinazzo.
It includes harrowing footage of a visit by survivor, Frania Bracorskajc, to Ponar forest, outside Vilna, where her family and friends used to holiday before the war. During the Holocaust, the forest became the site of the massacre of more than 20,000 men, women and children from the Vilna Ghetto.

Holocaust memorial at Ponar forest, Lithuania

Holocaust memorial at Ponar forest, Lithuania

Media coverage for the Southbank screenings was achieved on prime-time national, Victorian, Melbourne metropolitan and local community radio—including Radio National Drive with Rebecca Huntley (The Sound of Lithuania’s Vilna Ghetto) and ABC 774 Melbourne with Richard Stubbs—as well as in key publications that spoke directly to the intended audience, including Australian Jewish News, the Port Phillip and Caulfield Leader, and Bayside Weekly Review.
In addition, copies of the DVD were sent on request to ABC radio, Bayside Weekly Review, Radio Southern FM, Radio SYN, Australian Arts Review, FilmInk magazine, and Arts Hub.
The DVD garnered a three-and-a-half star review from Arts Hub Film Critic, Sarah Ward, as well as glowing reviews from Australian Arts Review and FilmInk, one of the Australian film industry’s most popular publications.
Media information:
Wolfe Words writing, publicity and media strategy

Article: Sharing Media Clips—Are You Infringing Copyright?

Recently, the Copyright Agency has started fining PR agencies for posting media clippings on their websites and / or sharing clips with clients, without paying a copyright licence fee. Be aware—and be prepared!

by Diana Wolfe

An edited version of this how-to article was published in No Fussing About e-news on 1 February 2014.


Recently, the Copyright Agency has started fining PR agencies for posting media clippings on their websites and / or sharing clips with clients, without paying a copyright licence fee. Unbeknown to many, the copyright fee we pay to media monitoring services such as Slice does not entitle us to reproduce and distribute the clips, even to the clients who paid for the campaign. So whenever we happily report on our media campaigns (with clippings attached) to clients, we’re breaking copyright law.
While it may look like a money-raking exercise by the publishers and media, and PRs might be tempted to ignore the warnings, this is brewing as a big issue that won’t go away. No matter how large or small your agency, if you’re found to be in breach of copyright, ignorance is no excuse. Some agencies have already been fined thousands of dollars for past transgressions, without being aware they were breaking the law.
If you want to continue sending clips to clients (and how else do we prove the success of a campaign, apart from forwarding URL links to the stories online, which is legal?), you’ll need to buy a Business Copyright Licence through the Copyright Agency. You can purchase a pay-for-use licence or an annual licence, the fee for which varies according to how many employees you have, the number of clients you have, and the estimated number of clips you’ll forward to them each month. And you have to report annually on the clips you’ve forwarded and / or posted online.
You can opt to purchase a retrospective licence, backdated for the past six years, which is the statute of limitations for a publisher to take legal action under the Copyright Act 1968.
The Public Relations Institute of Australia is keeping its members abreast of the situation with webinars, podcasts, Q&As etc., and it’s also worth checking out the Australian Copyright Council website.

© 2014 Diana Wolfe. This article may be reproduced and shared in part or fully across any platform or media, provided the author’s name and business name (Diana Wolfe, Wolfe Words) is acknowledged.